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Effects of sulfur dioxide pollution on bark epiphytes

Journal Article:

Abstract

The destructive effects of sulfur dioxide pollution on epiphytic bryophytes is seen to be due to chlorophyll degradation and the impairment of cell structure and function through plasmolysis. Morphological changes noted by Pearson and Skye (1965) in lichens were not seen, although stunting and infertility are evident in epiphyte remnants in polluted areas. The investigation of the ion exchange and buffer capacities of sycamore bark indicates a loss of both in approximate proportion to the degree of pollution. Smoke and aerosol particles are not considered to be of particular importance at the present time although they may well have been important in the past.
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1967
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-84-179105
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Trans. Br. Bryol. Soc.; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 5:2
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; PLANTS; INJURIES; SULFUR DIOXIDE; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; AIR POLLUTION; LICHENS; MOSSES; ALGAE; CHALCOGENIDES; FUNGI; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POLLUTION; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; SULFUR OXIDES; 560303* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Plants- (-1987)
OSTI ID:
6405660
Research Organizations:
Univ. of London, England
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: TBBSA
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 341-347
Announcement Date:
Oct 01, 1984

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Coker, P D. Effects of sulfur dioxide pollution on bark epiphytes. United Kingdom: N. p., 1967. Web.
Coker, P D. Effects of sulfur dioxide pollution on bark epiphytes. United Kingdom.
Coker, P D. 1967. "Effects of sulfur dioxide pollution on bark epiphytes." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_6405660,
title = {Effects of sulfur dioxide pollution on bark epiphytes}
author = {Coker, P D}
abstractNote = {The destructive effects of sulfur dioxide pollution on epiphytic bryophytes is seen to be due to chlorophyll degradation and the impairment of cell structure and function through plasmolysis. Morphological changes noted by Pearson and Skye (1965) in lichens were not seen, although stunting and infertility are evident in epiphyte remnants in polluted areas. The investigation of the ion exchange and buffer capacities of sycamore bark indicates a loss of both in approximate proportion to the degree of pollution. Smoke and aerosol particles are not considered to be of particular importance at the present time although they may well have been important in the past.}
journal = {Trans. Br. Bryol. Soc.; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {5:2}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1967}
month = {Jan}
}