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Comparative effects of cobalt, nickel and copper on plant growth

Abstract

An account is given of the present position of our knowledge with regard to the distribution and the physiological importance of nickel and cobalt, in relation to plants and animals. Experiments on barley and broad beans were carried out in water cultures with the sulfates and chlorides of cobalt, nickel and copper. In every case a range of low concentrations did little or no damage, but toxic action occurred abruptly above a concentration which varied with the species and with the compound. With barley, copper was the most poisonous element in either compound, but the differences were not striking. Low concentrations of the sulfate were innocuous, but parallel low strengths of the chloride caused a slight, significant depression in growth. With broad beans, cobalt was much more poisonous than either nickel or copper, particularly with the sulfate. No slight depression with low concentrations of the chloride was noticeable with this species. The morphological response to toxicity varied with the element concerned. Copper, in poisonous strengths, caused shortening and bunching of barley roots, whereas nickel and cobalt permitted the growth of elongated roots of a very attenuated nature. The individuality of plant response to poison was frequently shown by the great  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Nov 01, 1938
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-84-179136
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Ann. Appl. Biol.; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 25:4
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; COBALT; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; COPPER; NICKEL; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; PLANTS; TOXICITY; ELEMENTS; METALS; TRANSITION ELEMENTS; 560303* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Plants- (-1987)
OSTI ID:
6405533
Research Organizations:
Rothamsted Experimental Station, Harpenden, England
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: AABIA
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 671-694
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Brenchley, W E. Comparative effects of cobalt, nickel and copper on plant growth. United Kingdom: N. p., 1938. Web. doi:10.1111/j.1744-7348.1938.tb02347.x.
Brenchley, W E. Comparative effects of cobalt, nickel and copper on plant growth. United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/j.1744-7348.1938.tb02347.x.
Brenchley, W E. 1938. "Comparative effects of cobalt, nickel and copper on plant growth." United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/j.1744-7348.1938.tb02347.x. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1111/j.1744-7348.1938.tb02347.x.
@misc{etde_6405533,
title = {Comparative effects of cobalt, nickel and copper on plant growth}
author = {Brenchley, W E}
abstractNote = {An account is given of the present position of our knowledge with regard to the distribution and the physiological importance of nickel and cobalt, in relation to plants and animals. Experiments on barley and broad beans were carried out in water cultures with the sulfates and chlorides of cobalt, nickel and copper. In every case a range of low concentrations did little or no damage, but toxic action occurred abruptly above a concentration which varied with the species and with the compound. With barley, copper was the most poisonous element in either compound, but the differences were not striking. Low concentrations of the sulfate were innocuous, but parallel low strengths of the chloride caused a slight, significant depression in growth. With broad beans, cobalt was much more poisonous than either nickel or copper, particularly with the sulfate. No slight depression with low concentrations of the chloride was noticeable with this species. The morphological response to toxicity varied with the element concerned. Copper, in poisonous strengths, caused shortening and bunching of barley roots, whereas nickel and cobalt permitted the growth of elongated roots of a very attenuated nature. The individuality of plant response to poison was frequently shown by the great variation in growth in the borderline concentrations just below those which caused marked depression of growth.}
doi = {10.1111/j.1744-7348.1938.tb02347.x}
journal = {Ann. Appl. Biol.; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {25:4}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1938}
month = {Nov}
}