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Behaviour of mercury compounds in soil

Abstract

The uses of inorganic compounds of mercury for the control of plant pests is reviewed, and a summary of the relevant chemical and physical properties of the compounds concerned is given. On chemical evidence a working hypothesis is propounded showing that all compounds may be expected to decompose into metallic mercury. A pot technique is described by means of which a correlation can be obtained between the effective mercury content of a given soil sample and the rate of growth of wheat seedlings. The mathematical treatment of the results is described, and the validity of the pot technique is verified by statistical analysis of results. Using the pot technqiue it is shown that volatilization losses are insignificant but that mercury is slowly rendered ineffective by the formation of mercuric sulphide. The effect of sulphur-reducing bacteria is considered and the influence of Vibrio desulphuricans on mercury is studied in detail. Experimental evidence obtained by the pot technique is produced to show that mercurous chloride slowly decomposes in the soil giving mercury and mercuric chloride, mercuric chloride rapidly decomposes into mercury and mercurous chloride, and other inorganic compounds decompose directly into mercury. The working hypothesis is substantiated in all major aspects. The  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1944
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-84-190446
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Ann. Appl. Biol.; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 31
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; MERCURY COMPOUNDS; BIODEGRADATION; SOIL CHEMISTRY; CHEMICAL PROPERTIES; ORGANOMETALLIC COMPOUNDS; PESTICIDES; PHYSICAL PROPERTIES; PLANT GROWTH; SOILS; SULFATE-REDUCING BACTERIA; WHEAT; BACTERIA; CEREALS; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; CHEMISTRY; DECOMPOSITION; GRASS; GROWTH; MICROORGANISMS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PLANTS; 510200* - Environment, Terrestrial- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (-1989)
OSTI ID:
6386697
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: AABIA
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 340-359
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Booer, J R. Behaviour of mercury compounds in soil. United Kingdom: N. p., 1944. Web. doi:10.1111/j.1744-7348.1944.tb06747.x.
Booer, J R. Behaviour of mercury compounds in soil. United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/j.1744-7348.1944.tb06747.x.
Booer, J R. 1944. "Behaviour of mercury compounds in soil." United Kingdom. doi:10.1111/j.1744-7348.1944.tb06747.x. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1111/j.1744-7348.1944.tb06747.x.
@misc{etde_6386697,
title = {Behaviour of mercury compounds in soil}
author = {Booer, J R}
abstractNote = {The uses of inorganic compounds of mercury for the control of plant pests is reviewed, and a summary of the relevant chemical and physical properties of the compounds concerned is given. On chemical evidence a working hypothesis is propounded showing that all compounds may be expected to decompose into metallic mercury. A pot technique is described by means of which a correlation can be obtained between the effective mercury content of a given soil sample and the rate of growth of wheat seedlings. The mathematical treatment of the results is described, and the validity of the pot technique is verified by statistical analysis of results. Using the pot technqiue it is shown that volatilization losses are insignificant but that mercury is slowly rendered ineffective by the formation of mercuric sulphide. The effect of sulphur-reducing bacteria is considered and the influence of Vibrio desulphuricans on mercury is studied in detail. Experimental evidence obtained by the pot technique is produced to show that mercurous chloride slowly decomposes in the soil giving mercury and mercuric chloride, mercuric chloride rapidly decomposes into mercury and mercurous chloride, and other inorganic compounds decompose directly into mercury. The working hypothesis is substantiated in all major aspects. The uses and properties of the organo-mercury compounds are then discussed. Type compounds selected are ethyl mercury phosphate, phenyl mercury acetate and methoxyethyl mercury acetate. Using the pot technique it is shown that the formation of organo-mercury clays takes place and that these clays decompose giving metallic mercury. A mechanism is suggested.}
doi = {10.1111/j.1744-7348.1944.tb06747.x}
journal = {Ann. Appl. Biol.; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {31}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1944}
month = {Jan}
}