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Evaluation of the Limulus amoebocyte lysate test in conjunction with a gram negative bacterial plate count for detecting irradiation of chicken

Journal Article:

Abstract

A study to evaluate the potential of the Limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) test in conjunction with a Gram negative bacterial (GNB) plate count for detecting the irradiation of chicken is described. Preliminary studies demonstrated that chickens irradiated at an absorbed dose of 2.5 kGy could be differentiated from unirradiated birds by measuring levels of endotoxin and of numbers of GNB on chicken skin. Irradiated birds were found to have endotoxin levels similar to those found in unirradiated birds but significantly lower numbers of GNB. In a limited study the test was found to be applicable to birds from different processors. The effect of temperature abuse on the microbiological profile, and thus the efficacy of the test, was also investigated. After temperature abuse, the irradiated birds were identifiable at worst up to 3 days after irradiation treatment at the 2.5 kGy level and at best some 13 days after irradiation. Temperature abuse at 15{sup 0}C resulted in rapid recovery of surviving micro-organisms which made differentiation of irradiated and unirradiated birds using this test unreliable. The microbiological quality of the bird prior to irradiation treatment also affected the test as large numbers of GNB present on the bird prior to irradiation treatment  More>>
Authors:
Scotter, S L; Wood, R; McWeeny, D J [1] 
  1. Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, Norwich (UK). Food Science Lab.
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1990
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
AIX-22-003510; EDB-91-006401
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Radiation Physics and Chemistry (International Journal of Radiation Applications and Instrumentation Part C); (UK); Journal Volume: 36:5
Subject:
60 APPLIED LIFE SCIENCES; RADURIZATION; FOWL; RADIATION DETECTION; BACTERIA; ENDOTOXINS; LOW TEMPERATURE; MEDIUM TEMPERATURE; SENSITIVITY; TEMPERATURE DEPENDENCE; VIABILITY; ANIMALS; ANTIGENS; BIRDS; DETECTION; MATERIALS; MICROORGANISMS; TOXIC MATERIALS; TOXINS; VERTEBRATES; 553004* - Agriculture & Food Technology- Food Protection & Preservation- (1987-)
OSTI ID:
6365650
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0146-5724; CODEN: RPCHD
Submitting Site:
GBN
Size:
Pages: 629-638
Announcement Date:
Jan 01, 1991

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Scotter, S L, Wood, R, and McWeeny, D J. Evaluation of the Limulus amoebocyte lysate test in conjunction with a gram negative bacterial plate count for detecting irradiation of chicken. United Kingdom: N. p., 1990. Web.
Scotter, S L, Wood, R, & McWeeny, D J. Evaluation of the Limulus amoebocyte lysate test in conjunction with a gram negative bacterial plate count for detecting irradiation of chicken. United Kingdom.
Scotter, S L, Wood, R, and McWeeny, D J. 1990. "Evaluation of the Limulus amoebocyte lysate test in conjunction with a gram negative bacterial plate count for detecting irradiation of chicken." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_6365650,
title = {Evaluation of the Limulus amoebocyte lysate test in conjunction with a gram negative bacterial plate count for detecting irradiation of chicken}
author = {Scotter, S L, Wood, R, and McWeeny, D J}
abstractNote = {A study to evaluate the potential of the Limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) test in conjunction with a Gram negative bacterial (GNB) plate count for detecting the irradiation of chicken is described. Preliminary studies demonstrated that chickens irradiated at an absorbed dose of 2.5 kGy could be differentiated from unirradiated birds by measuring levels of endotoxin and of numbers of GNB on chicken skin. Irradiated birds were found to have endotoxin levels similar to those found in unirradiated birds but significantly lower numbers of GNB. In a limited study the test was found to be applicable to birds from different processors. The effect of temperature abuse on the microbiological profile, and thus the efficacy of the test, was also investigated. After temperature abuse, the irradiated birds were identifiable at worst up to 3 days after irradiation treatment at the 2.5 kGy level and at best some 13 days after irradiation. Temperature abuse at 15{sup 0}C resulted in rapid recovery of surviving micro-organisms which made differentiation of irradiated and unirradiated birds using this test unreliable. The microbiological quality of the bird prior to irradiation treatment also affected the test as large numbers of GNB present on the bird prior to irradiation treatment resulted in larger numbers of survivors. In addition, monitoring the developing flora after irradiation treatment amd during subsequent chilled storage also aided differentiation of irradiated and unirradiated birds. Large numbers of yeast and Gram positive cocci were isolated from irradiated carcasses whereas Gram negative oxidative rods were the predominant spoilage flora on unirradiated birds. (author).}
journal = {Radiation Physics and Chemistry (International Journal of Radiation Applications and Instrumentation Part C); (UK)}
volume = {36:5}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1990}
month = {Jan}
}