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Atmospheric pollution and plant growth

Journal Article:

Abstract

Although sulfur dioxide is the most common and usually the most abundant polluting agent, experiments with this gas have shown that, under the conditions employed, there is no effect on yield unless the concentration is high enough to cause leaf injury. S23 ryegrass was grown in beds in greenhouses. Treatment with purified air gave, with one exception, a dry weight considerably higher than treatment with polluted air. No sign of leaf damage could be detected in the greenhouse with polluted air. This fact would seem to indicate that pollution decreases the growth rate, even in the absence of visible injury.
Publication Date:
Mar 01, 1952
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-84-179131
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nature (London); (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 169:4296
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; AIR POLLUTION; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; GROWTH; INHIBITION; GRASS; INJURIES; LEAVES; PLANTS; RYE; SULFUR DIOXIDE; CEREALS; CHALCOGENIDES; GRAMINEAE; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POLLUTION; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; SULFUR OXIDES; 560303* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Plants- (-1987)
OSTI ID:
6352603
Research Organizations:
Univ. of Manchester, England
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: NATUA
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 376-377
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Bleasdale, J K.A. Atmospheric pollution and plant growth. United Kingdom: N. p., 1952. Web. doi:10.1038/169376a0.
Bleasdale, J K.A. Atmospheric pollution and plant growth. United Kingdom. doi:10.1038/169376a0.
Bleasdale, J K.A. 1952. "Atmospheric pollution and plant growth." United Kingdom. doi:10.1038/169376a0. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1038/169376a0.
@misc{etde_6352603,
title = {Atmospheric pollution and plant growth}
author = {Bleasdale, J K.A.}
abstractNote = {Although sulfur dioxide is the most common and usually the most abundant polluting agent, experiments with this gas have shown that, under the conditions employed, there is no effect on yield unless the concentration is high enough to cause leaf injury. S23 ryegrass was grown in beds in greenhouses. Treatment with purified air gave, with one exception, a dry weight considerably higher than treatment with polluted air. No sign of leaf damage could be detected in the greenhouse with polluted air. This fact would seem to indicate that pollution decreases the growth rate, even in the absence of visible injury.}
doi = {10.1038/169376a0}
journal = {Nature (London); (United Kingdom)}
volume = {169:4296}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1952}
month = {Mar}
}