You need JavaScript to view this

Delayed dermal burns caused by dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate

Abstract

A chemical operator handling dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate (DMAD) developed delayed and pain-free burns on one of his feet 2 days after a supposed spillage of DMAD. The injuries were confirmed to be associated with DMAD by chemical analysis of the operator's safety boot and patch tests. DMAD easily penetrates some protective clothing and dilute solutions can still be hazardous: the toxic effect is compounded by being delayed and painless. The lachrymatory irritant properties of undiluted DMAD are not adequate warning of its presence or spillage in quantities sufficient to cause significant skin damage.
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1984
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-85-015881
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Contact Dermatitis; (Denmark); Journal Volume: 11:1
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; ACETYLENE; HEALTH HAZARDS; TOXICITY; SKIN; INJURIES; ACCIDENTS; BURNS; CHEMICAL INDUSTRY; FAILURES; OCCUPATIONAL EXPOSURE; PROTECTIVE CLOTHING; SAFETY; ALKYNES; BODY; CLOTHING; HAZARDS; HYDROCARBONS; INDUSTRY; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANS; 560306* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Man- (-1987)
OSTI ID:
6346248
Research Organizations:
Fisons Pharmaceutical Division, Loughborough, Leicester, England
Country of Origin:
Denmark
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: CODED
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 29-30
Announcement Date:
Oct 01, 1984

Citation Formats

Slovak, A J, and Payne, A R. Delayed dermal burns caused by dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate. Denmark: N. p., 1984. Web. doi:10.1111/j.1600-0536.1984.tb00166.x.
Slovak, A J, & Payne, A R. Delayed dermal burns caused by dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate. Denmark. doi:10.1111/j.1600-0536.1984.tb00166.x.
Slovak, A J, and Payne, A R. 1984. "Delayed dermal burns caused by dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate." Denmark. doi:10.1111/j.1600-0536.1984.tb00166.x. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1111/j.1600-0536.1984.tb00166.x.
@misc{etde_6346248,
title = {Delayed dermal burns caused by dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate}
author = {Slovak, A J, and Payne, A R}
abstractNote = {A chemical operator handling dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate (DMAD) developed delayed and pain-free burns on one of his feet 2 days after a supposed spillage of DMAD. The injuries were confirmed to be associated with DMAD by chemical analysis of the operator's safety boot and patch tests. DMAD easily penetrates some protective clothing and dilute solutions can still be hazardous: the toxic effect is compounded by being delayed and painless. The lachrymatory irritant properties of undiluted DMAD are not adequate warning of its presence or spillage in quantities sufficient to cause significant skin damage.}
doi = {10.1111/j.1600-0536.1984.tb00166.x}
journal = {Contact Dermatitis; (Denmark)}
volume = {11:1}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Denmark}
year = {1984}
month = {Jul}
}