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Riddle of the sands

Journal Article:

Abstract

A geological model of the Alberta landscape during the period stretching from about 110 million to 100 million years ago during the Cretaceous period when dinosaurs roamed the earth, was sketched. Today, the region contains the Cold Lake oil sands deposit. Imperial Oil began large-scale production at Cold Lake in 1985. The formations within the area are the source of almost half of Imperial Oil`s daily crude oil production and account for one in every 20 barrels of oil produced daily in Canada. The bitumen is produced using cyclic steam stimulation where steam is injected at high pressure into the underground reservoir, fracturing the sandstone and heating the bitumen it holds to thin it so that it can then flow through well bores to the surface. Conventional geological theory suggested that the Cold Lake reservoir was the remains of a prehistoric river delta. In 1994, Imperial Oil established a Cold Lake sequence stratigraphy project to verify this theory. This highly complex project involves volumes of geophysical well-log data from the 2,500 wells at Cold Lake, core samples cut from more than 600 of these wells and microscopic fossilized remains of 100-million-year-old flora extracted from the core samples, and seismic information.  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Sep 01, 1998
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
SCA: 040200; PA: CANM-98:001787; EDB-98:085812; SN: 98001992775
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Imperial Oil Review; Journal Volume: 82; Journal Issue: 429; Other Information: PBD: Sum 1998
Subject:
04 OIL SHALES AND TAR SANDS; BITUMENS; OIL SAND DEPOSITS; COLD LAKE DEPOSIT; GEOLOGIC HISTORY; ALBERTA
OSTI ID:
633781
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: IMORAN; ISSN 0700-5156; TRN: CA9801787
Availability:
Available from Imperial Oil Ltd., 111 St. Clair Avenue W., Toronto, Ontario, M5W 1K3
Submitting Site:
CANM
Size:
pp. 8-11
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Rolheiser, P. Riddle of the sands. Canada: N. p., 1998. Web.
Rolheiser, P. Riddle of the sands. Canada.
Rolheiser, P. 1998. "Riddle of the sands." Canada.
@misc{etde_633781,
title = {Riddle of the sands}
author = {Rolheiser, P}
abstractNote = {A geological model of the Alberta landscape during the period stretching from about 110 million to 100 million years ago during the Cretaceous period when dinosaurs roamed the earth, was sketched. Today, the region contains the Cold Lake oil sands deposit. Imperial Oil began large-scale production at Cold Lake in 1985. The formations within the area are the source of almost half of Imperial Oil`s daily crude oil production and account for one in every 20 barrels of oil produced daily in Canada. The bitumen is produced using cyclic steam stimulation where steam is injected at high pressure into the underground reservoir, fracturing the sandstone and heating the bitumen it holds to thin it so that it can then flow through well bores to the surface. Conventional geological theory suggested that the Cold Lake reservoir was the remains of a prehistoric river delta. In 1994, Imperial Oil established a Cold Lake sequence stratigraphy project to verify this theory. This highly complex project involves volumes of geophysical well-log data from the 2,500 wells at Cold Lake, core samples cut from more than 600 of these wells and microscopic fossilized remains of 100-million-year-old flora extracted from the core samples, and seismic information. The interpreted data helps to create a three-dimensional model of the reservoir`s structure and help define its boundaries. Results have shown that the Cold Lake deposit was created from at least 13 intersecting river beds. Each of the rivers flowed for a few hundred thousand years and deposited sands of varying quality in different layers and patterns. The oil came about 40 million years later after the plant and animal materials containing hydrogen and carbon were broken down by heat and pressure to form oil. 1 fig.}
journal = {Imperial Oil Review}
issue = {429}
volume = {82}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Canada}
year = {1998}
month = {Sep}
}