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Tlatelolco treaty for the proscription of nuclear armaments in Latin America

Journal Article:

Abstract

The Tlateloco Treaty has established in Latin America the first and hitherto only zone free from nuclear armament existing in the inhabited world. This Latin American example guarantees not only the Continent's security from a future nuclear war, but it might also motivate the possible, though difficult, creation of other zones free from nuclear armament in other regions of the world. The Tlateloco system includes three instruments: a Treaty, open to signature and ratification by the Latin American States and two additional protocols. The Treaty includes regime of duties regarding military denuclearization, a control system, the creation of an organism (OPANAL) and the regime that governs pacific use of nuclear energy. The Treaty has been signed by 25 Latin American States (excepting Cuba, Guyana, Dominica and Santa Lucia), and ratified by 24 (excepting Argentine). There are 22 States members of OPANAL (all the rest, excepting Brazil and Chile). Additional Protocol I applies the military denuclearization regime to territories owned by non-Latin American States located in the Treaty zone. England and the Low Countries are Parts in the Additional Protocol I which has been signed, but not ratified, by the United States and France. Additional Protocol II establishes the duties of  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Mar 01, 1981
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-81-091902
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Interciencia; (Venezuela); Journal Volume: 6:2
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 98 NUCLEAR DISARMAMENT, SAFEGUARDS, AND PHYSICAL PROTECTION; LATIN AMERICA; TLATELOLCO TREATY; NUCLEAR WEAPONS; PROLIFERATION; SECURITY; TREATIES; WEAPONS; 290600* - Energy Planning & Policy- Nuclear Energy; 055002 - Nuclear Fuels- Safeguards, Inspection, & Accountability- Nontechnical Aspects
OSTI ID:
6276369
Research Organizations:
Cerrada de Monte Camerun, Mexico City, Mexico
Country of Origin:
Venezuela
Language:
Spanish
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: ITRCD
Submitting Site:
TIC
Size:
Pages: 81-85
Announcement Date:
Aug 01, 1981

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Espiell, H G. Tlatelolco treaty for the proscription of nuclear armaments in Latin America. Venezuela: N. p., 1981. Web.
Espiell, H G. Tlatelolco treaty for the proscription of nuclear armaments in Latin America. Venezuela.
Espiell, H G. 1981. "Tlatelolco treaty for the proscription of nuclear armaments in Latin America." Venezuela.
@misc{etde_6276369,
title = {Tlatelolco treaty for the proscription of nuclear armaments in Latin America}
author = {Espiell, H G}
abstractNote = {The Tlateloco Treaty has established in Latin America the first and hitherto only zone free from nuclear armament existing in the inhabited world. This Latin American example guarantees not only the Continent's security from a future nuclear war, but it might also motivate the possible, though difficult, creation of other zones free from nuclear armament in other regions of the world. The Tlateloco system includes three instruments: a Treaty, open to signature and ratification by the Latin American States and two additional protocols. The Treaty includes regime of duties regarding military denuclearization, a control system, the creation of an organism (OPANAL) and the regime that governs pacific use of nuclear energy. The Treaty has been signed by 25 Latin American States (excepting Cuba, Guyana, Dominica and Santa Lucia), and ratified by 24 (excepting Argentine). There are 22 States members of OPANAL (all the rest, excepting Brazil and Chile). Additional Protocol I applies the military denuclearization regime to territories owned by non-Latin American States located in the Treaty zone. England and the Low Countries are Parts in the Additional Protocol I which has been signed, but not ratified, by the United States and France. Additional Protocol II establishes the duties of the powers possessing nuclear armaments with respect to the denuclearized Latin American zone. It has been signed and ratified by the United States, France, Great Britian, China, and the USSR.}
journal = {Interciencia; (Venezuela)}
volume = {6:2}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Venezuela}
year = {1981}
month = {Mar}
}