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Embryotoxicity of arsenite and arsenate. Distribution in pregnant mice and monkeys and effects on embryonic cells in vitro

Journal Article:

Abstract

The distribution of /sup 74/As-labelled and arsenite in pregnant mice and a monkey has been studied by autoradiography and gamma counting of isolated tissues, and their in vitro toxicity to a chondrogenic system has been investigated. With both arsenic forms, given as single intravenous injections to the mother, the /sup 74/As-arsenic appeared to pass the mouse placenta relatively freely and approximately to the same extent. The retention time in material tissues including the placenta was, however, around three times longer with arsenite than with arsenate. In early gestation, high activity was registered in the embryonic neuroepithelium, which correlates well with reported CNS malformations in rodents. In late gestation, the distribution pattern was more like that in the adults. Accumulation in skin and squamous epithelia of the upper gastrointestinal tract (oral cavity, oesophagus and oesophageal region of stomach) dominated the distribution picture, especially at a long survival interval. Arsenate, but not arsenite, showed affinity for the calcified areas of the skeleton. A marmoset monkey in late gestation receiving arsenite showed a somewhat lower rate of placental transfer than the mice. Skin and liver had the highest concentrations (at 8 hrs), both in mother and foetuses. This species is known not to  More>>
Authors:
Lindgren, A; Danielsson, R G; Dencker, L; [1]  Vahter, M [2] 
  1. Department of Toxicology, Biomedical Center, Uppsala University, Sweden
  2. National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Stockholm, Sweden
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1984
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
AIX-15-072335; EDB-85-025583
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Acta Pharmacol. Toxicol.; (Denmark); Journal Volume: 54
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; ARSENIC; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; ARSENATES; ARSENIC 74; AUTORADIOGRAPHY; EMBRYOS; IN VITRO; MICE; MONKEYS; TISSUE DISTRIBUTION; TOXICITY; ANIMALS; ARSENIC COMPOUNDS; ARSENIC ISOTOPES; BETA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BETA-MINUS DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BETA-PLUS DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; DAYS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; DISTRIBUTION; ELECTRON CAPTURE RADIOISOTOPES; ELEMENTS; INTERMEDIATE MASS NUCLEI; ISOMERIC TRANSITION ISOTOPES; ISOTOPES; MAMMALS; NUCLEI; ODD-ODD NUCLEI; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PRIMATES; RADIOISOTOPES; RODENTS; SECONDS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; SEMIMETALS; VERTEBRATES; 560305* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Vertebrates- (-1987)
OSTI ID:
6266129
Country of Origin:
Denmark
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: APTOA
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 311-320
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Lindgren, A, Danielsson, R G, Dencker, L, and Vahter, M. Embryotoxicity of arsenite and arsenate. Distribution in pregnant mice and monkeys and effects on embryonic cells in vitro. Denmark: N. p., 1984. Web.
Lindgren, A, Danielsson, R G, Dencker, L, & Vahter, M. Embryotoxicity of arsenite and arsenate. Distribution in pregnant mice and monkeys and effects on embryonic cells in vitro. Denmark.
Lindgren, A, Danielsson, R G, Dencker, L, and Vahter, M. 1984. "Embryotoxicity of arsenite and arsenate. Distribution in pregnant mice and monkeys and effects on embryonic cells in vitro." Denmark.
@misc{etde_6266129,
title = {Embryotoxicity of arsenite and arsenate. Distribution in pregnant mice and monkeys and effects on embryonic cells in vitro}
author = {Lindgren, A, Danielsson, R G, Dencker, L, and Vahter, M}
abstractNote = {The distribution of /sup 74/As-labelled and arsenite in pregnant mice and a monkey has been studied by autoradiography and gamma counting of isolated tissues, and their in vitro toxicity to a chondrogenic system has been investigated. With both arsenic forms, given as single intravenous injections to the mother, the /sup 74/As-arsenic appeared to pass the mouse placenta relatively freely and approximately to the same extent. The retention time in material tissues including the placenta was, however, around three times longer with arsenite than with arsenate. In early gestation, high activity was registered in the embryonic neuroepithelium, which correlates well with reported CNS malformations in rodents. In late gestation, the distribution pattern was more like that in the adults. Accumulation in skin and squamous epithelia of the upper gastrointestinal tract (oral cavity, oesophagus and oesophageal region of stomach) dominated the distribution picture, especially at a long survival interval. Arsenate, but not arsenite, showed affinity for the calcified areas of the skeleton. A marmoset monkey in late gestation receiving arsenite showed a somewhat lower rate of placental transfer than the mice. Skin and liver had the highest concentrations (at 8 hrs), both in mother and foetuses. This species is known not to methylate arsenic, resulting in stronger binding and longer retention times of arsenic as compared with other species. The stronger binding in maternal tissues may possibly explain the lower rate of placental transfer. Arsenite was shown to inhibit cartilage formation in a chick limb bud mesenchymal spot culture system (ED50 approximately 5-10..mu..M) while arsenate seemed to be without effect at concentrations up to 200 ..mu..M (highest tested). Arsenate, however, showed a potential of the arsenite toxicity.}
journal = {Acta Pharmacol. Toxicol.; (Denmark)}
volume = {54}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Denmark}
year = {1984}
month = {Jan}
}