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Contamination of urban garden soils with copper and boron

Abstract

Spectrochemical analyses of garden soils sampled in the Edinburgh and Dundee areas indicate that there is substantial contamination of urban soils with copper and boron. These soils were analyzed spectrochemically with respect to total copper and water-extractable boron content with the view of comparing the levels obtained in urban areas with levels in arable soils in rural areas. The results indicate that urban garden soils contain about four times as much copper and two to three times as much water-soluble boron as rural arable soils. The existence of such a marked disparity between the levels of two potentially toxic elements in urban and rural areas is evidence of slow poisoning of the soil environment in built-up areas and is cause for concern. While the major source of contamination of soils with copper and boron is still a matter for speculation, it is probable that the addition of soot to garden soils and the fall-out of sooty material in built-up areas where atmospheric pollution is a problem make a substantial contribution to the water-extractable boron content of urban soils. Three samples of soot from domestic chimneys, obtained from independent sources, were found on analysis to contain 640, 650 and 555 p.p.m.  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jun 04, 1966
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-86-044000
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nature (London); (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 210:5040
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; BORON; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; POLLUTION SOURCES; COPPER; SOILS; CONTAMINATION; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; HORTICULTURE; RURAL AREAS; SOOT; UNITED KINGDOM; URBAN AREAS; AGRICULTURE; ELEMENTS; EUROPE; INDUSTRY; METALS; SEMIMETALS; TRANSITION ELEMENTS; WESTERN EUROPE; 510200* - Environment, Terrestrial- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (-1989)
OSTI ID:
6260076
Research Organizations:
Edinburgh School of Agriculture, Scotland
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: NATUA
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 1077-1078
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Purves, D. Contamination of urban garden soils with copper and boron. United Kingdom: N. p., 1966. Web. doi:10.1038/2101077b0.
Purves, D. Contamination of urban garden soils with copper and boron. United Kingdom. doi:10.1038/2101077b0.
Purves, D. 1966. "Contamination of urban garden soils with copper and boron." United Kingdom. doi:10.1038/2101077b0. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1038/2101077b0.
@misc{etde_6260076,
title = {Contamination of urban garden soils with copper and boron}
author = {Purves, D}
abstractNote = {Spectrochemical analyses of garden soils sampled in the Edinburgh and Dundee areas indicate that there is substantial contamination of urban soils with copper and boron. These soils were analyzed spectrochemically with respect to total copper and water-extractable boron content with the view of comparing the levels obtained in urban areas with levels in arable soils in rural areas. The results indicate that urban garden soils contain about four times as much copper and two to three times as much water-soluble boron as rural arable soils. The existence of such a marked disparity between the levels of two potentially toxic elements in urban and rural areas is evidence of slow poisoning of the soil environment in built-up areas and is cause for concern. While the major source of contamination of soils with copper and boron is still a matter for speculation, it is probable that the addition of soot to garden soils and the fall-out of sooty material in built-up areas where atmospheric pollution is a problem make a substantial contribution to the water-extractable boron content of urban soils. Three samples of soot from domestic chimneys, obtained from independent sources, were found on analysis to contain 640, 650 and 555 p.p.m. water-extractable boron, and it is evident that the addition to soil of even small amounts of soot with a boron content of this order would have a marked effect on its water-extractable boron content.}
doi = {10.1038/2101077b0}
journal = {Nature (London); (United Kingdom)}
volume = {210:5040}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1966}
month = {Jun}
}