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Anthropogenic CO2 distribution in the North Pacific ocean

Journal Article:

Abstract

This paper discusses the penetration depth of anthropogenic CO2 in the North Pacific Ocean based on carbonate data in the literature. The carbonate data in the literature were used to supplement the tracer data showing oceanic mixing features for waters formed in the last 140 years. The deepest penetration over 2,000m was found in the northwest North Pacific. On the other hand, the shallowest penetration to less than 400m was found in the eastern equatorial Pacific. Consequently, it was suggested that penetration depth of anthropogenic CO2 has been controlled by such factors as deep water formation in the Northwest Pacific, upwelling in the equatorial Pacific, and vertical mixing in the western boundary areas. It was revealed that these results are in harmony well with results implied from tritium, C-14, and freons distributions. The total inventory of excess carbon in the North Pacific was 14.7[plus minus]4[times]10[sup 15]g around 1980. 48 refs., 10 figs.
Authors:
Chen, C [1] 
  1. National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung (Taiwan, Province of China)
Publication Date:
Jun 01, 1993
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
NEDO-93-911871; EDB-93-136624
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Journal of Oceanography; (Japan); Journal Volume: 49:3
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; CARBON DIOXIDE; ANTHROPOLOGY; DISTRIBUTION; IMPREGNATION; PACIFIC OCEAN; CARBONATES; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; SEAWATER; MIXING; EQUATOR; FREONS; TRACE AMOUNTS; TRACER TECHNIQUES; TRITIUM; UPWELLING; BETA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BETA-MINUS DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CHALCOGENIDES; DATA; HALOGENATED ALIPHATIC HYDROCARBONS; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; HYDROGEN ISOTOPES; INFORMATION; ISOTOPE APPLICATIONS; ISOTOPES; LIGHT NUCLEI; NUCLEI; NUMERICAL DATA; ODD-EVEN NUCLEI; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC HALOGEN COMPOUNDS; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; RADIOISOTOPES; SEAS; SURFACE WATERS; WATER; YEARS LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; 540120* - Environment, Atmospheric- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (1990-); 290301 - Energy Planning & Policy- Environment, Health, & Safety- Regional & Global Environmental Aspects- (1992-)
OSTI ID:
6244547
Country of Origin:
Japan
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0916-8370; CODEN: JOOCE7
Submitting Site:
NEDO
Size:
Pages: 257-270
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Chen, C. Anthropogenic CO2 distribution in the North Pacific ocean. Japan: N. p., 1993. Web. doi:10.1007/BF02269564.
Chen, C. Anthropogenic CO2 distribution in the North Pacific ocean. Japan. doi:10.1007/BF02269564.
Chen, C. 1993. "Anthropogenic CO2 distribution in the North Pacific ocean." Japan. doi:10.1007/BF02269564. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1007/BF02269564.
@misc{etde_6244547,
title = {Anthropogenic CO2 distribution in the North Pacific ocean}
author = {Chen, C}
abstractNote = {This paper discusses the penetration depth of anthropogenic CO2 in the North Pacific Ocean based on carbonate data in the literature. The carbonate data in the literature were used to supplement the tracer data showing oceanic mixing features for waters formed in the last 140 years. The deepest penetration over 2,000m was found in the northwest North Pacific. On the other hand, the shallowest penetration to less than 400m was found in the eastern equatorial Pacific. Consequently, it was suggested that penetration depth of anthropogenic CO2 has been controlled by such factors as deep water formation in the Northwest Pacific, upwelling in the equatorial Pacific, and vertical mixing in the western boundary areas. It was revealed that these results are in harmony well with results implied from tritium, C-14, and freons distributions. The total inventory of excess carbon in the North Pacific was 14.7[plus minus]4[times]10[sup 15]g around 1980. 48 refs., 10 figs.}
doi = {10.1007/BF02269564}
journal = {Journal of Oceanography; (Japan)}
volume = {49:3}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Japan}
year = {1993}
month = {Jun}
}