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Dehydration of hydrated low-temperature tar

Journal Article:

Abstract

Yoshida examined the mechanism of the dehydration of hydrated low-temperature tar with a microscope. The tar containing free carbon and coal dust is so stable that the removal of the above substances and water by a physical method is very difficult. Addition of light oil produced by fractionation of low-temperature tar facilitates the operations. Yoshida tried using the separate acid, neutral, and basic components of the light oil; the acid oil proved to be most effective. For many reasons it is convenient to use light oil as it is. In this method the quantity of light oil required is 2 to 3 times that of tar. But in supplementing the centrifugal method, the quantity of light oil needed might be only half the amount of tar.
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1949
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-81-126737
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nagoya Kogyo Daigaku Gakuho; (Japan); Journal Volume: 1
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; COAL TAR; DEHYDRATION; CENTRIFUGATION; COAL TAR OILS; OILS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; OTHER ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; SEPARATION PROCESSES; TAR; 010500* - Coal, Lignite, & Peat- Products & By-Products
OSTI ID:
6244167
Country of Origin:
Japan
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: NADGA
Submitting Site:
TIC
Size:
Pages: 183-184
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Yoshida, T. Dehydration of hydrated low-temperature tar. Japan: N. p., 1949. Web.
Yoshida, T. Dehydration of hydrated low-temperature tar. Japan.
Yoshida, T. 1949. "Dehydration of hydrated low-temperature tar." Japan.
@misc{etde_6244167,
title = {Dehydration of hydrated low-temperature tar}
author = {Yoshida, T}
abstractNote = {Yoshida examined the mechanism of the dehydration of hydrated low-temperature tar with a microscope. The tar containing free carbon and coal dust is so stable that the removal of the above substances and water by a physical method is very difficult. Addition of light oil produced by fractionation of low-temperature tar facilitates the operations. Yoshida tried using the separate acid, neutral, and basic components of the light oil; the acid oil proved to be most effective. For many reasons it is convenient to use light oil as it is. In this method the quantity of light oil required is 2 to 3 times that of tar. But in supplementing the centrifugal method, the quantity of light oil needed might be only half the amount of tar.}
journal = {Nagoya Kogyo Daigaku Gakuho; (Japan)}
volume = {1}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Japan}
year = {1949}
month = {Jan}
}