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Lattice gauge calculation in particle theory

Abstract

There are many problems in particle physics which cannot be treated analytically, but are amenable to numcerical solution using today's most powerful computers. Prominent among such problems are those encountered in the theory of strong interactions, where the resolution of fundamental issues such as demonstrating quark confinement or evaluating hadronic structure is rooted in a successful description of the behaviour of a very large number of dynamical variables in non-linear interaction. This paper briefly outlines the mathematical problems met in the formulation of the quantum field theory for strong interactions, the motivation for numerical methods of resolution and the algorithms which are currently being used. Such algorithms require very large amounts of memory and computation and, because of their organized structure, are ideally suited for implementation on mainframes with vectorized architecture. While the details of the actual implementation will be coverd in other contributions to this conference, this paper will present an account of the most important physics results obtained up to now and will conclude with a survey of open problems in particle theory which could be solved numerically in the near future.
Authors:
Barkai, D; [1]  Moriarty, K J.M.; [2]  Rebbi, C; [3]  Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA). Physics Dept.)
  1. Control Data Corp., Fort Collins, CO (USA)
  2. Dalhousie Univ., Halifax, Nova Scotia (Canada). Inst. for Computational Studies
  3. European Organization for Nuclear Research, Geneva (Switzerland)
Publication Date:
May 01, 1985
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
CONF-8411209-
Reference Number:
AIX-16-072688; ERA-11-006568; EDB-86-006497
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Comput. Phys. Commun.; (Netherlands); Journal Volume: 36:3; Conference: International supercomputer applications symposium, Amsterdam, Netherlands, 7 Nov 1984
Subject:
72 PHYSICS OF ELEMENTARY PARTICLES AND FIELDS; LATTICE FIELD THEORY; COMPUTER CALCULATIONS; QUANTUM CHROMODYNAMICS; UNIFIED GAUGE MODELS; CENTRAL POTENTIAL; HADRONS; NUMERICAL SOLUTION; PROGRAMMING; QUARK-ANTIQUARK INTERACTIONS; STRONG INTERACTIONS; SU-3 GROUPS; BASIC INTERACTIONS; ELEMENTARY PARTICLES; FIELD THEORIES; INTERACTIONS; LIE GROUPS; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; PARTICLE INTERACTIONS; PARTICLE MODELS; POTENTIALS; QUANTUM FIELD THEORY; SU GROUPS; SYMMETRY GROUPS; 645400* - High Energy Physics- Field Theory
OSTI ID:
6236923
Country of Origin:
Netherlands
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: CPHCB
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 241-247
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Barkai, D, Moriarty, K J.M., Rebbi, C, and Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA). Physics Dept.). Lattice gauge calculation in particle theory. Netherlands: N. p., 1985. Web.
Barkai, D, Moriarty, K J.M., Rebbi, C, & Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA). Physics Dept.). Lattice gauge calculation in particle theory. Netherlands.
Barkai, D, Moriarty, K J.M., Rebbi, C, and Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA). Physics Dept.). 1985. "Lattice gauge calculation in particle theory." Netherlands.
@misc{etde_6236923,
title = {Lattice gauge calculation in particle theory}
author = {Barkai, D, Moriarty, K J.M., Rebbi, C, and Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (USA). Physics Dept.)}
abstractNote = {There are many problems in particle physics which cannot be treated analytically, but are amenable to numcerical solution using today's most powerful computers. Prominent among such problems are those encountered in the theory of strong interactions, where the resolution of fundamental issues such as demonstrating quark confinement or evaluating hadronic structure is rooted in a successful description of the behaviour of a very large number of dynamical variables in non-linear interaction. This paper briefly outlines the mathematical problems met in the formulation of the quantum field theory for strong interactions, the motivation for numerical methods of resolution and the algorithms which are currently being used. Such algorithms require very large amounts of memory and computation and, because of their organized structure, are ideally suited for implementation on mainframes with vectorized architecture. While the details of the actual implementation will be coverd in other contributions to this conference, this paper will present an account of the most important physics results obtained up to now and will conclude with a survey of open problems in particle theory which could be solved numerically in the near future.}
journal = {Comput. Phys. Commun.; (Netherlands)}
volume = {36:3}
place = {Netherlands}
year = {1985}
month = {May}
}