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Radar system for non-excavation flowmole drilling; Flowmole koho zenpo kanshi sensor no kaihatsu

Abstract

Technology is discussed of detecting structures buried in the ground by use of a forward-looking sensor mounted on the drill head for the avoidance of collision with such structures during application of the flowmole method in urban districts. In this detection system, pulsating radio signals are emitted from a transmission antenna and the received signals are converted into low-frequency signals in a sampling circuit for eventual display on a B-scope. Since the drill head for flowmole technology is as small as approximately 50-60mm in diameter, experiment is conducted to know the detectability of a very small antenna directed at a buried pipe. The basic phase of the experiment using the very small antenna includes a soil-filled tank test and field test. It is then found that the very small antenna is capable of detecting the steel pipe buried 50cm away from the antenna with the antenna directed at the said pipe. In a test wherein a very small antenna is allowed to rotate on the drill propelling shaft, the design simulating a revolving drill head, it is learned that the detecting system under study will identify the direction in which a buried structure exists. 1 ref., 9 figs.
Authors:
Nakauchi, T; Hayakawa, H; Tsunasaki, M; Kishi, M [1] 
  1. Osaka Gas Co. Ltd., Osaka (Japan)
Publication Date:
Oct 22, 1997
Product Type:
Miscellaneous
Report Number:
ETDE/JP-98751022; CONF-9710214-
Reference Number:
SCA: 440700; PA: JP-97:0G4566; EDB-98:075702; SN: 98001944502
Resource Relation:
Conference: 97. SEGJ conference, Butsuri tansa gakkai dai 97 kai (1997 nendo shuki) gakujutsu koenkai, Sapporo (Japan), 22-24 Oct 1997; Other Information: PBD: 22 Oct 1997; Related Information: Is Part Of Proceeding of the 97th (Fall, Fiscal 1997) SEGJ Conference; PB: 371 p.; Butsuri tansa gakkai dai 97 kai (1997 nendo shuki) gakujutsu koenkai koen ronbunshu
Subject:
44 INSTRUMENTATION, INCLUDING NUCLEAR AND PARTICLE DETECTORS; PROBES; UNDERGROUND; DETECTION; DRILL BITS; ROTATION; PULSES; WAVE FORMS; ANTENNAS; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; FIELD TESTS
OSTI ID:
622737
Research Organizations:
Society of Exploration Geophysicists of Japan, Tokyo (Japan)
Country of Origin:
Japan
Language:
Japanese
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE98751022; TRN: JN97G4566
Availability:
Available from Society of Exploration Geophysicists of Japan, 2-18, Nakamagome 2-chome, Ota-ku, Tokyo, (Japan); OSTI as DE98751022
Submitting Site:
NEDO
Size:
pp. 242-245
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Nakauchi, T, Hayakawa, H, Tsunasaki, M, and Kishi, M. Radar system for non-excavation flowmole drilling; Flowmole koho zenpo kanshi sensor no kaihatsu. Japan: N. p., 1997. Web.
Nakauchi, T, Hayakawa, H, Tsunasaki, M, & Kishi, M. Radar system for non-excavation flowmole drilling; Flowmole koho zenpo kanshi sensor no kaihatsu. Japan.
Nakauchi, T, Hayakawa, H, Tsunasaki, M, and Kishi, M. 1997. "Radar system for non-excavation flowmole drilling; Flowmole koho zenpo kanshi sensor no kaihatsu." Japan.
@misc{etde_622737,
title = {Radar system for non-excavation flowmole drilling; Flowmole koho zenpo kanshi sensor no kaihatsu}
author = {Nakauchi, T, Hayakawa, H, Tsunasaki, M, and Kishi, M}
abstractNote = {Technology is discussed of detecting structures buried in the ground by use of a forward-looking sensor mounted on the drill head for the avoidance of collision with such structures during application of the flowmole method in urban districts. In this detection system, pulsating radio signals are emitted from a transmission antenna and the received signals are converted into low-frequency signals in a sampling circuit for eventual display on a B-scope. Since the drill head for flowmole technology is as small as approximately 50-60mm in diameter, experiment is conducted to know the detectability of a very small antenna directed at a buried pipe. The basic phase of the experiment using the very small antenna includes a soil-filled tank test and field test. It is then found that the very small antenna is capable of detecting the steel pipe buried 50cm away from the antenna with the antenna directed at the said pipe. In a test wherein a very small antenna is allowed to rotate on the drill propelling shaft, the design simulating a revolving drill head, it is learned that the detecting system under study will identify the direction in which a buried structure exists. 1 ref., 9 figs.}
place = {Japan}
year = {1997}
month = {Oct}
}