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Ethanol production

Journal Article:

Abstract

Extractive fermentation is a technique that can be used to reduce the effect of end-product inhibition through the use of a water-immiscible phase which removes fermentation products in situ. This has the beneficial effect of not only removing inhibitory products as they are formed (thus keeping reaction rates high) but also has the potential for reducing product recovery costs. We have chosen to examine the ethanol fermentation as a model system for end product inhibition and extractive fermentation, and have developed a computer model predicting the productivity enhancement possible with this technique. The model predicts an ethanol productivity of 82.6 g/L-h if a glucose feed of 750 g/L is fermented with a solvent having a distribution coefficient of 0.5 at a dilution rate of 5.0 h . This is more than 10 times higher than for a conventional chemostat fermentation of a 250 g/L glucose feed. In light of this, a systematic approach to extractive fermentation has been undertaken involving the screening of more than 1,000 solvents for their extractive properties. UNIFAC and UNIQUAC estimates of distribution coefficients and selectivities were compiled and ranked in a database, together with other important physical properties, such as density, surface tension and viscosity.  More>>
Publication Date:
May 01, 1985
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
NOR-85-03034; EDB-86-031962
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Energy Process./Can.; (Canada); Journal Volume: 77:5
Subject:
09 BIOMASS FUELS; ETHANOL; PRODUCTION; GLUCOSE; FERMENTATION; BIOCHEMISTRY; COMPUTERIZED SIMULATION; DATA BASE MANAGEMENT; DILUTION; INHIBITION; MATERIALS TESTING; PERFORMANCE TESTING; SOLVENT EXTRACTION; SOLVENTS; ALCOHOLS; ALDEHYDES; BIOCONVERSION; CARBOHYDRATES; CHEMISTRY; EXTRACTION; HEXOSES; HYDROXY COMPOUNDS; MANAGEMENT; MONOSACCHARIDES; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; SACCHARIDES; SEPARATION PROCESSES; SIMULATION; TESTING; 090222* - Alcohol Fuels- Preparation from Wastes or Biomass- (1976-1989)
OSTI ID:
6212955
Research Organizations:
Department of Chemical Engineering, Queen's University, Kingston, Ontario
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: EPCAD
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 26-30
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Kolleurp, F, and Daugulis, A J. Ethanol production. Canada: N. p., 1985. Web.
Kolleurp, F, & Daugulis, A J. Ethanol production. Canada.
Kolleurp, F, and Daugulis, A J. 1985. "Ethanol production." Canada.
@misc{etde_6212955,
title = {Ethanol production}
author = {Kolleurp, F, and Daugulis, A J}
abstractNote = {Extractive fermentation is a technique that can be used to reduce the effect of end-product inhibition through the use of a water-immiscible phase which removes fermentation products in situ. This has the beneficial effect of not only removing inhibitory products as they are formed (thus keeping reaction rates high) but also has the potential for reducing product recovery costs. We have chosen to examine the ethanol fermentation as a model system for end product inhibition and extractive fermentation, and have developed a computer model predicting the productivity enhancement possible with this technique. The model predicts an ethanol productivity of 82.6 g/L-h if a glucose feed of 750 g/L is fermented with a solvent having a distribution coefficient of 0.5 at a dilution rate of 5.0 h . This is more than 10 times higher than for a conventional chemostat fermentation of a 250 g/L glucose feed. In light of this, a systematic approach to extractive fermentation has been undertaken involving the screening of more than 1,000 solvents for their extractive properties. UNIFAC and UNIQUAC estimates of distribution coefficients and selectivities were compiled and ranked in a database, together with other important physical properties, such as density, surface tension and viscosity. Preliminary shake-flask and chemostat biocompatibility studies on the most promising solvents have been undertaken. The previous predictive, data base and experimental results are discussed.}
journal = {Energy Process./Can.; (Canada)}
volume = {77:5}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Canada}
year = {1985}
month = {May}
}