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Rare earth elements in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. [Pr, Tb, Ho, Tm, Lu, La, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Yb, Ce]

Abstract

The first profiles of Pr, Tb, Ho, Tm and Lu in the Pacific Ocean, as well as profiles of La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd and Yb are reported. Concentrations of REE (except Ce) in the deep water are two to three times higher than those observed in the deep Atlantic Ocean. Surface water concentrations are typically lower than in the Atlantic Ocean, especially for the heavier elements Ho,Tm,Yb and Lu. Cerium is strongly depleted in the Pacific water column, but less so in the oxygen minimum zone. The distribution of the REE group is consistent with two simultaneous processes: (1) cycling similar to that of opal and calcium carbonate, and (2) adsorptive scavenging by settling particles and possibly by uptake at ocean boundaries. However, the first process can probably not be sustained by the low REE contents of shells, unless additional adsorption on surfaces is invoked. The second process, adsorptive scavenging, largely controls the oceanic distribution and typical seawater pattern of the rare earths. (author).
Publication Date:
Sep 01, 1985
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
AIX-17-016244; EDB-86-036063
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 49:9
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; ATLANTIC OCEAN; RADIOACTIVITY; PACIFIC OCEAN; RARE EARTHS; RADIOECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; SPATIAL DISTRIBUTION; SEAWATER; RADIONUCLIDE MIGRATION; CERIUM; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; EUROPIUM; GADOLINIUM; HOLMIUM; LANTHANUM; LUTETIUM; NEODYMIUM; PRASEODYMIUM; SAMARIUM; TERBIUM; THULIUM; YTTERBIUM; DISTRIBUTION; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; ELEMENTS; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; MASS TRANSFER; METALS; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; SEAS; SURFACE WATERS; WATER; 520301* - Environment, Aquatic- Radioactive Materials Monitoring & Transport- Water- (1987)
OSTI ID:
6182479
Research Organizations:
Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, MA, USA; California Univ., Santa Cruz, USA. Center for Coastal Marine Studies
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: GCACA
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 1943-1959
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Baar, H J.W. de, Bacon, M P, Brewer, P G, and Bruland, K W. Rare earth elements in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. [Pr, Tb, Ho, Tm, Lu, La, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Yb, Ce]. United Kingdom: N. p., 1985. Web. doi:10.1016/0016-7037(85)90089-4.
Baar, H J.W. de, Bacon, M P, Brewer, P G, & Bruland, K W. Rare earth elements in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. [Pr, Tb, Ho, Tm, Lu, La, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Yb, Ce]. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/0016-7037(85)90089-4.
Baar, H J.W. de, Bacon, M P, Brewer, P G, and Bruland, K W. 1985. "Rare earth elements in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. [Pr, Tb, Ho, Tm, Lu, La, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Yb, Ce]." United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/0016-7037(85)90089-4. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1016/0016-7037(85)90089-4.
@misc{etde_6182479,
title = {Rare earth elements in the Pacific and Atlantic Oceans. [Pr, Tb, Ho, Tm, Lu, La, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Yb, Ce]}
author = {Baar, H J.W. de, Bacon, M P, Brewer, P G, and Bruland, K W}
abstractNote = {The first profiles of Pr, Tb, Ho, Tm and Lu in the Pacific Ocean, as well as profiles of La, Ce, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd and Yb are reported. Concentrations of REE (except Ce) in the deep water are two to three times higher than those observed in the deep Atlantic Ocean. Surface water concentrations are typically lower than in the Atlantic Ocean, especially for the heavier elements Ho,Tm,Yb and Lu. Cerium is strongly depleted in the Pacific water column, but less so in the oxygen minimum zone. The distribution of the REE group is consistent with two simultaneous processes: (1) cycling similar to that of opal and calcium carbonate, and (2) adsorptive scavenging by settling particles and possibly by uptake at ocean boundaries. However, the first process can probably not be sustained by the low REE contents of shells, unless additional adsorption on surfaces is invoked. The second process, adsorptive scavenging, largely controls the oceanic distribution and typical seawater pattern of the rare earths. (author).}
doi = {10.1016/0016-7037(85)90089-4}
journal = {Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {49:9}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1985}
month = {Sep}
}