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The weakest link: a technological perspective on Canadian industrial underdevelopment

Abstract

The authors develop the position that Canada's industrial malaise derives from the behavior of firms in Canada. More specifically, one of the most important agents of the malaise is the way many firms of foreign origin have been permitted to operate. Foreign direct investment in goods production has produced a cumulatively detrimental impact on industrial competitiveness and on the country's long-term development. This impact works on the economy both directly and indirectly. Canada urgently requires a comprehensive industrial strategy to facilitate the growth of competitive (not merely more efficient) firms. Enhanced productivity is simply not sufficient to meet the challenges posed by the high costs of production in Canada. The creation of technological and innovative capability alone will ensure Canada's participation in the third wave of industrial development. Technology development policy must occupy a central position in the wider industrial strategy that is so urgently needed. The authors propose possible directions for Canadian technology development and stress the need for a healthy business climate in general. Government leadership and action are obviously needed, but the proposed approach need not increase present government involvement in the economy. Rather a redeployment and an increased coherence of that effort is required.
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1978
Product Type:
Book
Reference Number:
EPA-05-002600; ERA-04-036629; EDB-79-062364
Resource Relation:
Related Information: Background Study 43
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; CANADA; INDUSTRY; TRADE; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; COMPETITION; ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT; ECONOMIC GROWTH; ECONOMY; EMPLOYMENT; EXPORTS; GLOBAL ASPECTS; IMPORTS; INFLATION; INVESTMENT; MANAGEMENT; MANUFACTURING; STANDARD OF LIVING; TABLES; TECHNOLOGY UTILIZATION; USA; DATA FORMS; NORTH AMERICA; 290400* - Energy Planning & Policy- Energy Resources; 290200 - Energy Planning & Policy- Economics & Sociology
OSTI ID:
6177919
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Availability:
Printing and Publishing Supply and Services Canada, Ottawa $6.00.
Submitting Site:
TIC
Size:
Pages: 215
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Britton, J N.H., Bilmour, J M, and Murphy, M G. The weakest link: a technological perspective on Canadian industrial underdevelopment. Canada: N. p., 1978. Web.
Britton, J N.H., Bilmour, J M, & Murphy, M G. The weakest link: a technological perspective on Canadian industrial underdevelopment. Canada.
Britton, J N.H., Bilmour, J M, and Murphy, M G. 1978. "The weakest link: a technological perspective on Canadian industrial underdevelopment." Canada.
@misc{etde_6177919,
title = {The weakest link: a technological perspective on Canadian industrial underdevelopment}
author = {Britton, J N.H., Bilmour, J M, and Murphy, M G}
abstractNote = {The authors develop the position that Canada's industrial malaise derives from the behavior of firms in Canada. More specifically, one of the most important agents of the malaise is the way many firms of foreign origin have been permitted to operate. Foreign direct investment in goods production has produced a cumulatively detrimental impact on industrial competitiveness and on the country's long-term development. This impact works on the economy both directly and indirectly. Canada urgently requires a comprehensive industrial strategy to facilitate the growth of competitive (not merely more efficient) firms. Enhanced productivity is simply not sufficient to meet the challenges posed by the high costs of production in Canada. The creation of technological and innovative capability alone will ensure Canada's participation in the third wave of industrial development. Technology development policy must occupy a central position in the wider industrial strategy that is so urgently needed. The authors propose possible directions for Canadian technology development and stress the need for a healthy business climate in general. Government leadership and action are obviously needed, but the proposed approach need not increase present government involvement in the economy. Rather a redeployment and an increased coherence of that effort is required.}
place = {Canada}
year = {1978}
month = {Jan}
}