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Engineering for a disposal facility using the in-room emplacement method

Abstract

This report describes three nuclear fuel waste disposal vaults using the in-room emplacement method. First, a generic disposal vault design is provided which is suitable for a depth range of 500 m to 1000 m in highly stressed, sparsely fractured rock. The design process is described for all components of the system. The generic design is then applied to two different disposal vaults, one at a depth of 750 m in a low hydraulically conductive, sparsely fractured rock mass and another at a depth of 500 m in a higher conductivity, moderately fractured rock mass. In the in-room emplacement method, the disposal containers with used-fuel bundles are emplaced within the confines of the excavated rooms of a disposal vault. The discussion of the disposal-facility design process begins with a detailed description of a copper-shell, packed-particulate disposal container and the factors that influenced its design. The disposal-room generic design is presented including the detailed specifications, the scoping and numerical thermal and thermal mechanical analyses, the backfilling and sealing materials, and the operational processes. One room design is provided that meets all the requirements for a vault depth range of 500 to 1000 m. A disposal-vault layout and the factors that influenced  More>>
Publication Date:
Jun 01, 1996
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
AECL-11595; COG-96-223.
Reference Number:
SCA: 052002; PA: AIX-29:030376; EDB-98:058420; SN: 98001967716
Resource Relation:
Other Information: DN: 72 refs., 15 tabs., 63 figs.; PBD: Jun 1996
Subject:
05 NUCLEAR FUELS; CONTAINMENT; ENGINEERING DRAWINGS; FUEL ELEMENT CLUSTERS; POSITIONING; RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL; RADIONUCLIDE MIGRATION; UNDERGROUND DISPOSAL
OSTI ID:
612924
Research Organizations:
Atomic Energy of Canada Ltd., Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada).
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE98625440; TRN: CA9800239030376
Availability:
INIS; OSTI as DE98625440
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
156 p.
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Baumgartner, P, Bilinsky, D M, Ates, Y, Read, R S, Crosthwaite, J L, and Dixon, D A. Engineering for a disposal facility using the in-room emplacement method. Canada: N. p., 1996. Web.
Baumgartner, P, Bilinsky, D M, Ates, Y, Read, R S, Crosthwaite, J L, & Dixon, D A. Engineering for a disposal facility using the in-room emplacement method. Canada.
Baumgartner, P, Bilinsky, D M, Ates, Y, Read, R S, Crosthwaite, J L, and Dixon, D A. 1996. "Engineering for a disposal facility using the in-room emplacement method." Canada.
@misc{etde_612924,
title = {Engineering for a disposal facility using the in-room emplacement method}
author = {Baumgartner, P, Bilinsky, D M, Ates, Y, Read, R S, Crosthwaite, J L, and Dixon, D A}
abstractNote = {This report describes three nuclear fuel waste disposal vaults using the in-room emplacement method. First, a generic disposal vault design is provided which is suitable for a depth range of 500 m to 1000 m in highly stressed, sparsely fractured rock. The design process is described for all components of the system. The generic design is then applied to two different disposal vaults, one at a depth of 750 m in a low hydraulically conductive, sparsely fractured rock mass and another at a depth of 500 m in a higher conductivity, moderately fractured rock mass. In the in-room emplacement method, the disposal containers with used-fuel bundles are emplaced within the confines of the excavated rooms of a disposal vault. The discussion of the disposal-facility design process begins with a detailed description of a copper-shell, packed-particulate disposal container and the factors that influenced its design. The disposal-room generic design is presented including the detailed specifications, the scoping and numerical thermal and thermal mechanical analyses, the backfilling and sealing materials, and the operational processes. One room design is provided that meets all the requirements for a vault depth range of 500 to 1000 m. A disposal-vault layout and the factors that influenced its design are also presented, including materials handling, general logistics, and separation of radiological and nonradiological operations. Modifications to the used-fuel packaging plant for the filling and sealing of the copper-shell, packed-particulate disposal containers and a brief description of the common surface facilities needed by the disposal vault and the packaging plant are provided. The implementation of the disposal facility is outlined, describing the project stages and activities and itemizing a specific plan for each of the project stages: siting, construction, operation; decommissioning; and closure. (author). 72 refs., 15 tabs., 63 figs.}
place = {Canada}
year = {1996}
month = {Jun}
}