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Searching for genomic constraints

Journal Article:

Abstract

The authors have analyzed general properties of very long DNA sequences belonging to simple and complex organisms, by using different correlation methods. They have distinguished those base compositional rules that concern the entire genome which they call `genomic constraints` from the rules that depend on the `external natural selection` acting on single genes, i. e. protein-centered constraints. They show that G + C content, purine / pyrimidine distributions and biological complexity of the organism are the most important factors which determine base compositional rules and genome complexity. Three main facts are here reported: bacteria with high G + C content have more restrictions on base composition than those with low G + C content; at constant G + C content more complex organisms, ranging from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes (e.g. human) display an increase of repeats 10-20 nucleotides long, which are also partly responsible for long-range correlations; work selection of length 3 to 10 is stronger in human and in bacteria for two distinct reasons. With respect to previous studies, they have also compared the genomic sequence of the archeon Methanococcus jannaschii with those of bacteria and eukaryotes: it shows sometimes an intermediate statistical behaviour.
Authors:
Lio`, P; [1]  Ruffo, S [2] 
  1. Cambridge, Univ. (United Kingdom). Genetics Dept.
  2. Florence, Univ. (Italy). Fac. di Ingegneria. Dipt. di Energetica `S. Stecco`
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1998
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
SCA: 661300; PA: ITA-98:000554; EDB-98:063635; SN: 98001966535
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nuovo Cimento della Societa Italiana di Fisica, [Sezione] D: Condensed Matter, Atomic, Molecular and Chemical Physics, Biophysics; Journal Volume: 20D; Journal Issue: 1; Other Information: PBD: Jan 1998
Subject:
66 PHYSICS; DNA; BIOPHYSICS; CRYSTAL LATTICES; PHONONS; THERMODYNAMICS
OSTI ID:
612087
Country of Origin:
Italy
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: NCSDDN; ISSN 0392-6737; TRN: IT9800554
Submitting Site:
ITA
Size:
pp. 113-127
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Lio`, P, and Ruffo, S. Searching for genomic constraints. Italy: N. p., 1998. Web.
Lio`, P, & Ruffo, S. Searching for genomic constraints. Italy.
Lio`, P, and Ruffo, S. 1998. "Searching for genomic constraints." Italy.
@misc{etde_612087,
title = {Searching for genomic constraints}
author = {Lio`, P, and Ruffo, S}
abstractNote = {The authors have analyzed general properties of very long DNA sequences belonging to simple and complex organisms, by using different correlation methods. They have distinguished those base compositional rules that concern the entire genome which they call `genomic constraints` from the rules that depend on the `external natural selection` acting on single genes, i. e. protein-centered constraints. They show that G + C content, purine / pyrimidine distributions and biological complexity of the organism are the most important factors which determine base compositional rules and genome complexity. Three main facts are here reported: bacteria with high G + C content have more restrictions on base composition than those with low G + C content; at constant G + C content more complex organisms, ranging from prokaryotes to higher eukaryotes (e.g. human) display an increase of repeats 10-20 nucleotides long, which are also partly responsible for long-range correlations; work selection of length 3 to 10 is stronger in human and in bacteria for two distinct reasons. With respect to previous studies, they have also compared the genomic sequence of the archeon Methanococcus jannaschii with those of bacteria and eukaryotes: it shows sometimes an intermediate statistical behaviour.}
journal = {Nuovo Cimento della Societa Italiana di Fisica, [Sezione] D: Condensed Matter, Atomic, Molecular and Chemical Physics, Biophysics}
issue = {1}
volume = {20D}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Italy}
year = {1998}
month = {Jan}
}