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Introduction to pollution and biology

Journal Article:

Abstract

The mechanism of photosynthesis, environmental conditions, and the chemical and biological significance of photosynthetic bacteria are discussed. Photosynthetic bacteria, which are extremely useful and important in the ecological system, can become a cause of pollution when excessively proliferated. The idea that pollution could be solved by planting vegetation is also a misconcept. Carbon dioxide is not the major source of pollution, and local increases of CO/sub 2/ partial pressure do not affect the environment in general. More important, green plants are sensitive to air pollutants and react faster than any other living things to pollutants such as fluorides, nitrate, ozone, peroxyacetyl nitrate, and sulfur dioxide. Only 1-3% of solar energy is used for photosynthesis. The use must be increased to maximum by effective planning of plant formation, density, and arrangements. Through genetic studies, production and proliferation of useful plants should be planned and developed. Pollution control must be programmed ecologically, suitable ecological systems must be developed in various geographical areas, in addition to the effort to eliminate pollution sources.
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1972
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-85-039624
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Kagaku To Yakugaku No Kyoshitsu; (Japan); Journal Volume: 35
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; AIR POLLUTION CONTROL; PHOTOSYNTHETIC BACTERIA; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; PLANTS; SENSITIVITY; POLLUTANTS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; AIR POLLUTION; CARBON DIOXIDE; CELL PROLIFERATION; FLUORIDES; GROWTH; NITRATES; OZONE; PEROXYACETYL NITRATE; PLANT BREEDING; SULFUR DIOXIDE; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CHALCOGENIDES; CONTROL; ESTERS; FLUORINE COMPOUNDS; HALIDES; HALOGEN COMPOUNDS; NITRIC ACID ESTERS; NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POLLUTION; POLLUTION CONTROL; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; SULFUR OXIDES; 500200* - Environment, Atmospheric- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (-1989); 560303 - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Plants- (-1987)
OSTI ID:
6113048
Country of Origin:
Japan
Language:
Japanese
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: KYKYD
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 21-30
Announcement Date:
Jan 01, 1985

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Horita, Y. Introduction to pollution and biology. Japan: N. p., 1972. Web.
Horita, Y. Introduction to pollution and biology. Japan.
Horita, Y. 1972. "Introduction to pollution and biology." Japan.
@misc{etde_6113048,
title = {Introduction to pollution and biology}
author = {Horita, Y}
abstractNote = {The mechanism of photosynthesis, environmental conditions, and the chemical and biological significance of photosynthetic bacteria are discussed. Photosynthetic bacteria, which are extremely useful and important in the ecological system, can become a cause of pollution when excessively proliferated. The idea that pollution could be solved by planting vegetation is also a misconcept. Carbon dioxide is not the major source of pollution, and local increases of CO/sub 2/ partial pressure do not affect the environment in general. More important, green plants are sensitive to air pollutants and react faster than any other living things to pollutants such as fluorides, nitrate, ozone, peroxyacetyl nitrate, and sulfur dioxide. Only 1-3% of solar energy is used for photosynthesis. The use must be increased to maximum by effective planning of plant formation, density, and arrangements. Through genetic studies, production and proliferation of useful plants should be planned and developed. Pollution control must be programmed ecologically, suitable ecological systems must be developed in various geographical areas, in addition to the effort to eliminate pollution sources.}
journal = {Kagaku To Yakugaku No Kyoshitsu; (Japan)}
volume = {35}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Japan}
year = {1972}
month = {Jan}
}