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Changes in the poleward energy flux by the atmosphere and ocean as a possible cause for ice ages

Journal Article:

Abstract

It is proposed that the two preferred modes of temperature and circulation of the atmosphere which occurred over the past 100,000 yr correspond to two modes of partitioning of the poleward energy flux between the atmosphere and ocean. At present the ocean carries an appreciable fraction of the transport, for example about three-eighths at 30/sup 0/N. In the cold mode it is suggested that the ocean carries less, and the atmosphere more, than at present. During the formation of the ice, at 50,000 BP, for example, the overall flux is expected to be slightly lower than at present and during melting, at 16,000 BP, slightly higher. The transition between the modes is seen as a natural imbalance in the atmosphere-ocean energy budget with a gradual warming of the ocean during an Ice Age eventually culminating in its termination. At the present the imbalance is thought to correspond to a natural cooling of the ocean, which will lead to the next Ice Age. The magnitude of temperature changes in the polar regions differ between the hemispheres in the same way as present seasonal changes, being larger in the northern than in the southern hemisphere. Overall the atmospheric energy cycle was more  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1974
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-79-113046
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Daiyonki-Kenkyu; (Japan); Journal Volume: 4
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; EARTH ATMOSPHERE; ENERGY TRANSFER; GEOLOGIC AGES; SEAS; ICE; POLAR REGIONS; QUATERNARY PERIOD; VARIATIONS; CENOZOIC ERA; SURFACE WATERS; 500100* - Environment, Atmospheric- Basic Studies- (-1989)
OSTI ID:
6102677
Research Organizations:
Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge
Country of Origin:
Japan
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: DAYKA
Submitting Site:
TIC
Size:
Pages: 117-127
Announcement Date:
Oct 01, 1979

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Newell, R E. Changes in the poleward energy flux by the atmosphere and ocean as a possible cause for ice ages. Japan: N. p., 1974. Web.
Newell, R E. Changes in the poleward energy flux by the atmosphere and ocean as a possible cause for ice ages. Japan.
Newell, R E. 1974. "Changes in the poleward energy flux by the atmosphere and ocean as a possible cause for ice ages." Japan.
@misc{etde_6102677,
title = {Changes in the poleward energy flux by the atmosphere and ocean as a possible cause for ice ages}
author = {Newell, R E}
abstractNote = {It is proposed that the two preferred modes of temperature and circulation of the atmosphere which occurred over the past 100,000 yr correspond to two modes of partitioning of the poleward energy flux between the atmosphere and ocean. At present the ocean carries an appreciable fraction of the transport, for example about three-eighths at 30/sup 0/N. In the cold mode it is suggested that the ocean carries less, and the atmosphere more, than at present. During the formation of the ice, at 50,000 BP, for example, the overall flux is expected to be slightly lower than at present and during melting, at 16,000 BP, slightly higher. The transition between the modes is seen as a natural imbalance in the atmosphere-ocean energy budget with a gradual warming of the ocean during an Ice Age eventually culminating in its termination. At the present the imbalance is thought to correspond to a natural cooling of the ocean, which will lead to the next Ice Age. The magnitude of temperature changes in the polar regions differ between the hemispheres in the same way as present seasonal changes, being larger in the northern than in the southern hemisphere. Overall the atmospheric energy cycle was more intense during the Ice Ages than now. Observational tests are proposed by which predictions from the present arguments may be compared with deductions about the environment of the past. Data used for the present state of the atmospheric general circulation are the latest global data available and contain no known major uncertainties. However, data for the oceanic circulation and energy budget are less well known for the present and almost unknown for the past. Hence the proposed imbalances must be treated as part of a speculative hypothesis, but one which eventually may be subject to observational test as no solar variability is invoked.}
journal = {Daiyonki-Kenkyu; (Japan)}
volume = {4}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Japan}
year = {1974}
month = {Jan}
}