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Home on the range: workers and wildlife tread warily between astronomical underground flows of energy and live shells

Journal Article:

Abstract

On a 2,600 square kilometres parcel of grassland that was once home to 300 species of dinosaurs, three Canadian entities, the military, the Alberta Energy Company and a community of rare and endangered animals provide an example of peaceful co-existence. For eight months of the year the Alberta Energy Company shares the land with Canadian and British military units; all shallow wells have been placed underground so the military can hold annual live-fire exercises. Gas reservoirs exists beneath 57 square kilometres of the range lying at 1,000 metres depth at 4,540 pounds of pressure, which can be increased to 2,050 pounds. The surface of the Suffield range belongs to the federal government, the mineral rights are held by the Province of Alberta, and proghorn antelopes, apparently unconcerned, graze on the ground as if the land belonged to them. They, and the golden eagles that nest in the banks of the South Saskatchewan River appear to be surviving the activities of their two giant co-habitants relatively well.
Authors:
Publication Date:
Apr 06, 1998
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
SCA: 020900; 030800; PA: CANM-98:001102; EDB-98:058115; SN: 98001946153
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Oilweek Magazine; Journal Volume: 49; Journal Issue: 14; Other Information: PBD: 6 Apr 1998
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; 03 NATURAL GAS; PETROLEUM; EXPLORATION; PRODUCTION; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; LAND RECLAMATION; HOME RANGE; ECOLOGY; WILD ANIMALS
OSTI ID:
607374
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: XZ756V; ISSN 1207-7933; TRN: CA9801102
Submitting Site:
CANM
Size:
pp. 33-36
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Lorenz, A. Home on the range: workers and wildlife tread warily between astronomical underground flows of energy and live shells. Canada: N. p., 1998. Web.
Lorenz, A. Home on the range: workers and wildlife tread warily between astronomical underground flows of energy and live shells. Canada.
Lorenz, A. 1998. "Home on the range: workers and wildlife tread warily between astronomical underground flows of energy and live shells." Canada.
@misc{etde_607374,
title = {Home on the range: workers and wildlife tread warily between astronomical underground flows of energy and live shells}
author = {Lorenz, A}
abstractNote = {On a 2,600 square kilometres parcel of grassland that was once home to 300 species of dinosaurs, three Canadian entities, the military, the Alberta Energy Company and a community of rare and endangered animals provide an example of peaceful co-existence. For eight months of the year the Alberta Energy Company shares the land with Canadian and British military units; all shallow wells have been placed underground so the military can hold annual live-fire exercises. Gas reservoirs exists beneath 57 square kilometres of the range lying at 1,000 metres depth at 4,540 pounds of pressure, which can be increased to 2,050 pounds. The surface of the Suffield range belongs to the federal government, the mineral rights are held by the Province of Alberta, and proghorn antelopes, apparently unconcerned, graze on the ground as if the land belonged to them. They, and the golden eagles that nest in the banks of the South Saskatchewan River appear to be surviving the activities of their two giant co-habitants relatively well.}
journal = {Oilweek Magazine}
issue = {14}
volume = {49}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Canada}
year = {1998}
month = {Apr}
}