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Structure and function of complex carbohydrates active in regulating plant-microbe interactions

Journal Article:

Abstract

A key regulatory role of complex carbohydrates in the interactions between plants and microbes has been established. The complex carbohydrates act as regulatory molecules or hormones in that the carbohydrates induce de novo protein synthesis in receptive cells. The first complex carbohydrate recognized to possess such regulatory properties is a polysaccharide (PS) present in the walls of fungi. Hormonal concentrations of this PS elicit plant cells to accumulate phytoalexins (antibiotics). More recently we have recognized that a PS in the walls of growing plant cells also elicits phytoalexin accumulation; microbes and viruses may cause the release of active fragments of this endogenous elicitor. Another PS in plant cell walls is the Proteinase Inhibitor Inducing Factor (PIIF). This hormone appears to protect plants by inducing synthesis in plants of proteins which specifically inhibit digestive enzymes of insects and bacteria. Glycoproteins secreted by incompatible races (races that do not infect the plant) of a fungal pathogen of soybeans protect seedlings from attack by compatible races. Glycoproteins from compatible races do not protect the seedlings. The acidic PS secreted by the nitrogen-fixing rhizobia appear to function in the infection of legumes by the rhizobia. W.D. Bauer and his co-workers have evidence that these  More>>
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1981
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
ERA-07-008619; EDB-82-014880
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Pure Appl. Chem.; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 53
Subject:
59 BASIC BIOLOGICAL SCIENCES; CARBOHYDRATES; BIOCHEMICAL REACTION KINETICS; STRUCTURAL CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; ANTIBIOTICS; ENZYME ACTIVITY; ENZYMES; GLUCOPROTEINS; METABOLISM; MICROORGANISMS; PLANTS; QUANTITY RATIO; ANTI-INFECTIVE AGENTS; DRUGS; KINETICS; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; PROTEINS; REACTION KINETICS; SACCHARIDES; 550200* - Biochemistry; 550700 - Microbiology
OSTI ID:
6063510
Research Organizations:
Univ. of Colorado, Boulder
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Contract Number:
EY-76-S-02-1426
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: PACHA
Submitting Site:
TIC
Size:
Pages: 79-88
Announcement Date:
Dec 01, 1981

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Albersheim, P, Darvill, A G, and McNeil, M. Structure and function of complex carbohydrates active in regulating plant-microbe interactions. United Kingdom: N. p., 1981. Web.
Albersheim, P, Darvill, A G, & McNeil, M. Structure and function of complex carbohydrates active in regulating plant-microbe interactions. United Kingdom.
Albersheim, P, Darvill, A G, and McNeil, M. 1981. "Structure and function of complex carbohydrates active in regulating plant-microbe interactions." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_6063510,
title = {Structure and function of complex carbohydrates active in regulating plant-microbe interactions}
author = {Albersheim, P, Darvill, A G, and McNeil, M}
abstractNote = {A key regulatory role of complex carbohydrates in the interactions between plants and microbes has been established. The complex carbohydrates act as regulatory molecules or hormones in that the carbohydrates induce de novo protein synthesis in receptive cells. The first complex carbohydrate recognized to possess such regulatory properties is a polysaccharide (PS) present in the walls of fungi. Hormonal concentrations of this PS elicit plant cells to accumulate phytoalexins (antibiotics). More recently we have recognized that a PS in the walls of growing plant cells also elicits phytoalexin accumulation; microbes and viruses may cause the release of active fragments of this endogenous elicitor. Another PS in plant cell walls is the Proteinase Inhibitor Inducing Factor (PIIF). This hormone appears to protect plants by inducing synthesis in plants of proteins which specifically inhibit digestive enzymes of insects and bacteria. Glycoproteins secreted by incompatible races (races that do not infect the plant) of a fungal pathogen of soybeans protect seedlings from attack by compatible races. Glycoproteins from compatible races do not protect the seedlings. The acidic PS secreted by the nitrogen-fixing rhizobia appear to function in the infection of legumes by the rhizobia. W.D. Bauer and his co-workers have evidence that these PS are required for the development of root hairs capable of being infected by symbiont rhizobia. Current knowledge of the structures of these biologically active complex carbohydrates will be presented.}
journal = {Pure Appl. Chem.; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {53}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1981}
month = {Jan}
}