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Nitrogen retention in river corridors: European perspective

Journal Article:

Abstract

The problem of nitrogen pollution in European surface- and groundwaters has become a focus of recent European and Scandinavian directives, with legislation calling for a 50% reduction of N losses by the years 1995 and 2000, respectively. This paper provides a conceptual framework upon which management strategies to reduce losses of diffuse nitrogen pollution to surface waters may be based. The control of nitrogen pollution may take place through an increase in the complexity of the landscape, not throughout the catchment area, but rather in specific zones, the river corridor in particular. Within river corridors, riparian areas have been recognized globally for their value as nutrient removal ''buffer systems''. Studies have identified vegetation uptake and microbial denitrification as the primary mechanisms responsible for N removal in these systems. For these processes to function optimally on an annual basis, both vegetation and water regime must be managed. The establishment and management of riparian buffer zones in suitable places within river corridors, will provide a stable and sustainable water-protection function. This will complement future nitrogen input control strategies, needed for both the long-term protection of groundwater and surface waters in Europe as a whole, and for the proposed 50% reduction in nitrogen  More>>
Authors:
Haycock, N; [1]  Pinay, G; [2]  Walker, Charles [3] 
  1. Dept. of Agriculture and Water Management, Silsoe College, Cranfield Institute of Technology (United Kingdom)
  2. CERR/CNRS, Toulouse (France)
  3. SBEG, Inst. of Ecology, Lund Univ. (Sweden)
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1993
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
SWD-93-007351; EDB-93-144327
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Ambio (Journal of the Human Environment, Research and Management); (Sweden); Journal Volume: 22:6
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; DENITRIFICATION; PLANTS; NITRATES; REMOVAL; BUFFERS; ENVIRONMENT; EUROPE; GROUND WATER; NITROGEN; RIVERS; WATER POLLUTION; WATER POLLUTION CONTROL; WATER QUALITY; WATERSHEDS; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; CONTROL; ELEMENTS; ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY; HYDROGEN COMPOUNDS; NITROGEN COMPOUNDS; NONMETALS; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; POLLUTION; POLLUTION CONTROL; STREAMS; SURFACE WATERS; WATER; 540320* - Environment, Aquatic- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (1990-)
OSTI ID:
6059385
Country of Origin:
Sweden
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0044-7447; CODEN: AMBOCX
Submitting Site:
SWD
Size:
Pages: 340-346
Announcement Date:
Nov 15, 1993

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Haycock, N, Pinay, G, and Walker, Charles. Nitrogen retention in river corridors: European perspective. Sweden: N. p., 1993. Web.
Haycock, N, Pinay, G, & Walker, Charles. Nitrogen retention in river corridors: European perspective. Sweden.
Haycock, N, Pinay, G, and Walker, Charles. 1993. "Nitrogen retention in river corridors: European perspective." Sweden.
@misc{etde_6059385,
title = {Nitrogen retention in river corridors: European perspective}
author = {Haycock, N, Pinay, G, and Walker, Charles}
abstractNote = {The problem of nitrogen pollution in European surface- and groundwaters has become a focus of recent European and Scandinavian directives, with legislation calling for a 50% reduction of N losses by the years 1995 and 2000, respectively. This paper provides a conceptual framework upon which management strategies to reduce losses of diffuse nitrogen pollution to surface waters may be based. The control of nitrogen pollution may take place through an increase in the complexity of the landscape, not throughout the catchment area, but rather in specific zones, the river corridor in particular. Within river corridors, riparian areas have been recognized globally for their value as nutrient removal ''buffer systems''. Studies have identified vegetation uptake and microbial denitrification as the primary mechanisms responsible for N removal in these systems. For these processes to function optimally on an annual basis, both vegetation and water regime must be managed. The establishment and management of riparian buffer zones in suitable places within river corridors, will provide a stable and sustainable water-protection function. This will complement future nitrogen input control strategies, needed for both the long-term protection of groundwater and surface waters in Europe as a whole, and for the proposed 50% reduction in nitrogen loading to the Baltic and North Sea coastal waters by the turn of the century. 52 refs, 5 figs}
journal = {Ambio (Journal of the Human Environment, Research and Management); (Sweden)}
volume = {22:6}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Sweden}
year = {1993}
month = {Jan}
}