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The cultivated agricultural environment

Abstract

Local agricultural practices in the Nordic countries have resulted in a great diversity in agriculture in the Nordic countries. The diversities mean that in the event of contamination of agricultural land by radioactive fallout the consequences may differ greatly from region to region. For crops and soils contaminated directly by radioactive fallout there are five primary causes for concern, namely: 1. short-term internal contamination of man and animals through ingestion of surface-contaminated mature crops; 2. internal contamination of crops through foliar intake; 3. contamination of mature crops from resuspended soil; 4. direct irradiation of agricultural workers; 5. internal irradiation from inhalation of resuspended soil particulates. In the short-term, most of the radionuclides likely to be released to the atmosphere in the event of an accident have a potential to cause problems in agriculture and many have the potential for causing long-term problems. Generally, the magnitude of the problems created will depend on the: deposition mechanism (wet or dry); radionuclide composition of the fallout; type of farming system (i.e. arable or dairy); type of soil (for instance organic soils are more sensitive than mineral soils with respect to radiocaesium); state of development of the crop which in turn is determined by  More>>
Authors:
Eriksson, Aa [1] 
  1. Swedish Univ. of Agricultural Sciences, Dept. of Radioecology (Sweden)
Publication Date:
Oct 01, 1997
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
NKS-97-18
Reference Number:
SCA: 553002; 560180; 560101; PA: AIX-29:024707; EDB-98:054741; SN: 98001958648
Resource Relation:
Other Information: DN: 56 refs.; PBD: Oct 1997; Related Information: Is Part Of Reclamation of contaminated urban and rural environments following a severe nuclear accident; Strand, P.; Skuterud, L. [eds.] [Norwegian Radiation Protection Authority (Norway)]; Melin, J. [ed.] [Swedish Radiation Protection Institute (Sweden)]; PB: [171] p.
Subject:
55 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, BASIC STUDIES; 56 BIOLOGY AND MEDICINE, APPLIED STUDIES; AGRICULTURE; CROPS; FOOD CHAINS; INHALATION; RADIATION ACCIDENTS; RADIONUCLIDE MIGRATION; REMEDIAL ACTION; RETENTION; RURAL AREAS; SOILS; SURFACE CONTAMINATION; UPTAKE
OSTI ID:
605597
Research Organizations:
Nordisk Kernesikkerhedsforskning, Roskilde (Denmark).
Country of Origin:
Denmark
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ON: DE98621575; CNN: Contract NKS/BER-6; ISBN 87-7893-017-0; TRN: DK9800055024707
Availability:
INIS; OSTI as DE98621575
Submitting Site:
DKN
Size:
pp. 18-51
Announcement Date:
Jun 10, 1998

Citation Formats

Eriksson, Aa. The cultivated agricultural environment. Denmark: N. p., 1997. Web.
Eriksson, Aa. The cultivated agricultural environment. Denmark.
Eriksson, Aa. 1997. "The cultivated agricultural environment." Denmark.
@misc{etde_605597,
title = {The cultivated agricultural environment}
author = {Eriksson, Aa}
abstractNote = {Local agricultural practices in the Nordic countries have resulted in a great diversity in agriculture in the Nordic countries. The diversities mean that in the event of contamination of agricultural land by radioactive fallout the consequences may differ greatly from region to region. For crops and soils contaminated directly by radioactive fallout there are five primary causes for concern, namely: 1. short-term internal contamination of man and animals through ingestion of surface-contaminated mature crops; 2. internal contamination of crops through foliar intake; 3. contamination of mature crops from resuspended soil; 4. direct irradiation of agricultural workers; 5. internal irradiation from inhalation of resuspended soil particulates. In the short-term, most of the radionuclides likely to be released to the atmosphere in the event of an accident have a potential to cause problems in agriculture and many have the potential for causing long-term problems. Generally, the magnitude of the problems created will depend on the: deposition mechanism (wet or dry); radionuclide composition of the fallout; type of farming system (i.e. arable or dairy); type of soil (for instance organic soils are more sensitive than mineral soils with respect to radiocaesium); state of development of the crop which in turn is determined by the season of the year. (EG). 56 refs.}
place = {Denmark}
year = {1997}
month = {Oct}
}