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Man, environment and nuclear energy

Technical Report:

Abstract

The acceptability of nuclear fission as energy source is governed by three factors, economic, ecological and sociological. the economic context the gradual exhaustion of fossil fuels is a result of ever-increasing demands. The biological risk concept which determines the acceptable industrial application level is the second factor to be considered. The danger of radioactive contamination is almost unexistent except in the accident hypothesis, and power stations are built with excessive safeguards against hypothetical accidents. The idea of systematic processing of all working effluent to reduce radioactive waste discharge by several orders of magnitude is being examined. The only serious problems seem to be the disposal of radioactive wastes and the plutonium non-proliferation question bound up with breeder reactors. Whereas vitrification offers some solution to the radioactive waste conditioning problem, responsibility for the proliferation of nuclear weapons rests with the human conscience alone. The development of nuclear power stations over several decades seems to present no inacceptable danger and offers the best compromise betweengrowth and minimum risk requirements. The third factor to be accounted for is the opposition displayed by a fraction of the population to the development of nuclear energy for peaceful applications.
Authors:
Publication Date:
Oct 01, 1978
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
FRNC-TH-991
Reference Number:
AIX-12-622037; ERA-07-014701; EDB-82-029354
Resource Relation:
Other Information: Thesis
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; 22 GENERAL STUDIES OF NUCLEAR REACTORS; NUCLEAR POWER PLANTS; BIOLOGICAL RADIATION EFFECTS; ECONOMICS; ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACTS; RADIOACTIVE WASTE DISPOSAL; NUCLEAR WEAPONS; PROLIFERATION; ENVIRONMENTAL EXPOSURE PATHWAY; FOOD CHAINS; HEALTH HAZARDS; HUMAN POPULATIONS; NUCLEAR ENERGY; PUBLIC RELATIONS; RADIATION ACCIDENTS; RADIOECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; ACCIDENTS; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; ENERGY; HAZARDS; MANAGEMENT; NUCLEAR FACILITIES; POPULATIONS; POWER PLANTS; RADIATION EFFECTS; THERMAL POWER PLANTS; WASTE DISPOSAL; WASTE MANAGEMENT; WEAPONS; 290600* - Energy Planning & Policy- Nuclear Energy; 053000 - Nuclear Fuels- Environmental Aspects; 220500 - Nuclear Reactor Technology- Environmental Aspects
OSTI ID:
6048287
Research Organizations:
Grenoble-1 Univ., 38 (France)
Country of Origin:
France
Language:
French
Availability:
Available from Service de Documentation, CEN Saclay, 91191 Gif-sur-Yvette Cedex (France).
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
Pages: 220
Announcement Date:

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Gardan, J. Man, environment and nuclear energy. France: N. p., 1978. Web.
Gardan, J. Man, environment and nuclear energy. France.
Gardan, J. 1978. "Man, environment and nuclear energy." France.
@misc{etde_6048287,
title = {Man, environment and nuclear energy}
author = {Gardan, J}
abstractNote = {The acceptability of nuclear fission as energy source is governed by three factors, economic, ecological and sociological. the economic context the gradual exhaustion of fossil fuels is a result of ever-increasing demands. The biological risk concept which determines the acceptable industrial application level is the second factor to be considered. The danger of radioactive contamination is almost unexistent except in the accident hypothesis, and power stations are built with excessive safeguards against hypothetical accidents. The idea of systematic processing of all working effluent to reduce radioactive waste discharge by several orders of magnitude is being examined. The only serious problems seem to be the disposal of radioactive wastes and the plutonium non-proliferation question bound up with breeder reactors. Whereas vitrification offers some solution to the radioactive waste conditioning problem, responsibility for the proliferation of nuclear weapons rests with the human conscience alone. The development of nuclear power stations over several decades seems to present no inacceptable danger and offers the best compromise betweengrowth and minimum risk requirements. The third factor to be accounted for is the opposition displayed by a fraction of the population to the development of nuclear energy for peaceful applications.}
place = {France}
year = {1978}
month = {Oct}
}