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Coral reef growth in an era of rapidly rising sea level: predictions and suggestions for long-term research

Journal Article:

Abstract

Coral reef growth is intimately linked to sea level. It has been postulated that over the next century, sea level will rise at a probable average rate of 15 mm/year, in response to fossil fuel emissions, heating, and melting of the Antarctic ice cap. This predicted rate of sea level rise is five times the present modal rate of vertical accretion on coral reef flats and 50% greater than the maximum vertical accretion rates apparently attained by coral reefs. We use these predictions and observations to offer the following hypothesis for reef growth over the next century. The vertical accretion rates of protected reef flats will accelerate from the present modal rate up to the maximum rate, in response to the more rapidly rising sea level. This more rapid vertical accretion rate will be insufficient to keep up with sea level rise, if present predictions prove to be correct. Less protected reef flats will slow their rate of growth as they become inundated and subjected to erosion by progressively larger waves. This projected sea level rise and postulated reef response will provide an opportunity for long- term studies of the response of coral reef systems to a predictable and measurable  More>>
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1988
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-89-080769
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Coral Reefs; (Germany, Federal Republic of); Journal Volume: 7
Subject:
58 GEOSCIENCES; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CORALS; ANIMAL GROWTH; SEA LEVEL; MODIFICATIONS; CARBON DIOXIDE; FORECASTING; GREENHOUSE EFFECT; ICE CAPS; LEVELS; MELTING; REEFS; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CHALCOGENIDES; CNIDARIA; GEOLOGIC STRUCTURES; GROWTH; ICE; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PHASE TRANSFORMATIONS; 580500* - Oceanography- (1980-1989); 500200 - Environment, Atmospheric- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (-1989)
OSTI ID:
6034327
Research Organizations:
Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Livermore, California 94550, USA; Hawaii Institute of Marine Biology, University of Hawaii, Honolulu, Hawaii 96822, USA
Country of Origin:
Germany
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: CORFD
Submitting Site:
CDIC
Size:
Pages: 51-56
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Buddemeier, R W, and Smith, S V. Coral reef growth in an era of rapidly rising sea level: predictions and suggestions for long-term research. Germany: N. p., 1988. Web.
Buddemeier, R W, & Smith, S V. Coral reef growth in an era of rapidly rising sea level: predictions and suggestions for long-term research. Germany.
Buddemeier, R W, and Smith, S V. 1988. "Coral reef growth in an era of rapidly rising sea level: predictions and suggestions for long-term research." Germany.
@misc{etde_6034327,
title = {Coral reef growth in an era of rapidly rising sea level: predictions and suggestions for long-term research}
author = {Buddemeier, R W, and Smith, S V}
abstractNote = {Coral reef growth is intimately linked to sea level. It has been postulated that over the next century, sea level will rise at a probable average rate of 15 mm/year, in response to fossil fuel emissions, heating, and melting of the Antarctic ice cap. This predicted rate of sea level rise is five times the present modal rate of vertical accretion on coral reef flats and 50% greater than the maximum vertical accretion rates apparently attained by coral reefs. We use these predictions and observations to offer the following hypothesis for reef growth over the next century. The vertical accretion rates of protected reef flats will accelerate from the present modal rate up to the maximum rate, in response to the more rapidly rising sea level. This more rapid vertical accretion rate will be insufficient to keep up with sea level rise, if present predictions prove to be correct. Less protected reef flats will slow their rate of growth as they become inundated and subjected to erosion by progressively larger waves. This projected sea level rise and postulated reef response will provide an opportunity for long- term studies of the response of coral reef systems to a predictable and measurable forcing function.}
journal = {Coral Reefs; (Germany, Federal Republic of)}
volume = {7}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Germany}
year = {1988}
month = {Jan}
}