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Tanker self-help spill recovery systems

Technical Report:

Abstract

An investigation was conducted of the circumstances in which oil spills occur from tankers at sea by analyzing available historical oil spill data. A data base of marine oil spills greater than 134 tonnes occurring from 1974 and June 1990, included in an appendix, was among the information analyzed. The analysis showed that marine oil spills of 5,000 tonnes and greater account for 39.4% of the accidents yet 94.7% of the total spilled quantity; 84% of those spills occur in vessels of 20,000 deadweight tonnes and larger. Of spills over 5,000 tonnes, 78.5% occur outside of harbor or pier areas where spill response equipment may not be readily available. Over 50% of spills are caused by groundings or collisions where the vessel crew might be able to respond in mitigating and controlling the outflow of oil. The review suggested that tanker self-help systems warrant serious consideration. Potential self-help systems are described, ranging from additives such as bioremediation, dispersants, and solidifiers to equipment such as portable pumps, booms, and skimmers. Candidate systems were examined in terms of their safety, ease of operation, practicability, and effectiveness. Their possible performance was then assessed for the case of major marine oil spills that have  More>>
Publication Date:
Dec 01, 1991
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
MC/C-7335; MICROLOG-93-01466
Reference Number:
CANM-93-0E6017; EDB-93-124673
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; OIL SPILLS; WATER POLLUTION CONTROL; TANKER SHIPS; COMPILED DATA; OIL POLLUTION CONTAINMENT; TECHNOLOGY ASSESSMENT; CONTROL; DATA; INFORMATION; NUMERICAL DATA; POLLUTION CONTROL; SHIPS; 020900* - Petroleum- Environmental Aspects
OSTI ID:
6016693
Research Organizations:
Monenco Consultants Ltd., Calgary, AB (Canada)
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Availability:
PC Transport Canada, Library and Information Centre, Place de Ville, Tower C (AFCHAG) 2nd. Floor, Ottawa, ON, CAN K1A 0N5; MF CANMET/TID, Energy, Mines and Resources Canada, 555 Booth St., Ottawa, Ont., Canada K1A 0G1 PC
Submitting Site:
CANM
Size:
Pages: (176 p)
Announcement Date:
May 13, 2001

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Smedley, J B, Wainwright, J G, and Ehman, T K. Tanker self-help spill recovery systems. Canada: N. p., 1991. Web.
Smedley, J B, Wainwright, J G, & Ehman, T K. Tanker self-help spill recovery systems. Canada.
Smedley, J B, Wainwright, J G, and Ehman, T K. 1991. "Tanker self-help spill recovery systems." Canada.
@misc{etde_6016693,
title = {Tanker self-help spill recovery systems}
author = {Smedley, J B, Wainwright, J G, and Ehman, T K}
abstractNote = {An investigation was conducted of the circumstances in which oil spills occur from tankers at sea by analyzing available historical oil spill data. A data base of marine oil spills greater than 134 tonnes occurring from 1974 and June 1990, included in an appendix, was among the information analyzed. The analysis showed that marine oil spills of 5,000 tonnes and greater account for 39.4% of the accidents yet 94.7% of the total spilled quantity; 84% of those spills occur in vessels of 20,000 deadweight tonnes and larger. Of spills over 5,000 tonnes, 78.5% occur outside of harbor or pier areas where spill response equipment may not be readily available. Over 50% of spills are caused by groundings or collisions where the vessel crew might be able to respond in mitigating and controlling the outflow of oil. The review suggested that tanker self-help systems warrant serious consideration. Potential self-help systems are described, ranging from additives such as bioremediation, dispersants, and solidifiers to equipment such as portable pumps, booms, and skimmers. Candidate systems were examined in terms of their safety, ease of operation, practicability, and effectiveness. Their possible performance was then assessed for the case of major marine oil spills that have occurred in Canadian waters. Four systems are identified as potential candidates for further evaluation and possible implementation: internal oil transfer, hydrostatic loading, external oil lightering, and contingency planning. A system design is evaluated and its benefits and possible implementation are outlined, based on integration of the preferred attributes of the above four options. Recommendations for implementation are also provided. 28 refs., 6 figs., 33 tabs.}
place = {Canada}
year = {1991}
month = {Dec}
}