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LOOP: engineering marvel, economic calamity

Journal Article:

Abstract

The Louisiana Offshore Oil Port (LOOP) is the first superport built in the Lower 48. The United States was the only major oil-importing country that did not have a superport, and therefore, could not offload very large crude carriers (VLCCs). Unfortunately, a number of factors changed after it was decided to build LOOP, and these, plus the onerous provisions of the Deepwater Ports Act of 1974, which authorized superports, prevented LOOP from operating economically. LOOP's facilities consist of an offshore platform complex with three single-point-mooring (SPM) system buoys, 19 miles offshore in 110 feet of water, as well as a 32-million-barrel storage terminal 31 miles inland at Clovelly Salt Dome, and connecting pipelines offshore and onshore. By the time LOOP was started-up in May 1981, demand for oil had declined, because of rises in the price of oil, and the source of US oil imports had shifted back to the western hemisphere, away from the eastern hemisphere, closer to the US. The refinery mix in the US also changed, because of up-grading of a number of big refineries, which further reduced demand and made heavier crudes from countries like Mexico and Venezuela more economical. Because of reduced oil imports and  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1985
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EPA-11-002214; EDB-85-070923
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Energy Explor. Exploit.; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 3:2
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; DEEP WATER OIL TERMINALS; ECONOMIC ANALYSIS; OPERATION; LOUISIANA; ECONOMICS; FEDERAL REGION VI; NORTH AMERICA; TERMINAL FACILITIES; USA; 022000* - Petroleum- Transport, Handling, & Storage; 024000 - Petroleum- Storage- (-1989); 294002 - Energy Planning & Policy- Petroleum
OSTI ID:
6015378
Research Organizations:
Louisiana State Univ., Baton Rouge
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: EEEXD
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 139-145
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Brossard, E B. LOOP: engineering marvel, economic calamity. United Kingdom: N. p., 1985. Web.
Brossard, E B. LOOP: engineering marvel, economic calamity. United Kingdom.
Brossard, E B. 1985. "LOOP: engineering marvel, economic calamity." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_6015378,
title = {LOOP: engineering marvel, economic calamity}
author = {Brossard, E B}
abstractNote = {The Louisiana Offshore Oil Port (LOOP) is the first superport built in the Lower 48. The United States was the only major oil-importing country that did not have a superport, and therefore, could not offload very large crude carriers (VLCCs). Unfortunately, a number of factors changed after it was decided to build LOOP, and these, plus the onerous provisions of the Deepwater Ports Act of 1974, which authorized superports, prevented LOOP from operating economically. LOOP's facilities consist of an offshore platform complex with three single-point-mooring (SPM) system buoys, 19 miles offshore in 110 feet of water, as well as a 32-million-barrel storage terminal 31 miles inland at Clovelly Salt Dome, and connecting pipelines offshore and onshore. By the time LOOP was started-up in May 1981, demand for oil had declined, because of rises in the price of oil, and the source of US oil imports had shifted back to the western hemisphere, away from the eastern hemisphere, closer to the US. The refinery mix in the US also changed, because of up-grading of a number of big refineries, which further reduced demand and made heavier crudes from countries like Mexico and Venezuela more economical. Because of reduced oil imports and shorter hauls, oil shippers started using or continued to use smaller tankers. Smaller tankers are not economical for LOOP, nor do they need LOOP. The start-up of the Trans-Alaska Pipeline System (TAPS) in mid-1977 backed out 1.5 million bd/sup -1/ of foreign imports. TAPS' capacity coincides with LOOP's offloading capacity of 1.4 million bd/sup -1/. US decontrol of domestic crude in 1981 and increased drilling, plus general energy conservation further reduced US oil imports. US consumption declined to 15.1 million bd/sup -1/ in 1983, from 18.8 million bd/sup -1/ in 1978. This award-winning superport needed federal decontrol and increased oil imports along with more VLCCs, in order to operate economically.}
journal = {Energy Explor. Exploit.; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {3:2}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1985}
month = {Jan}
}