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Disappearing threat to ozone

Journal Article:

Abstract

Concern that human activities might disturb the dynamic natural equilibrium of the ozone layer has stemmed from the fact that this layer plays a key part in the ecology of the earth by absorbing harmful ultraviolet radiation which would otherwise penetrate to the ground. Apparently, however, a decline of as much at 15% in total global ozone would have very little effect on climate. A 50% reduction would produce a marked cooling of the stratosphere at 40 km altitude over the tropics, but barely detectable changes in temperature and rainfall in the lower atmosphere. Therefore, biological effects of more uv light at ground level is the only hazard associated with ozone depletion on the scale which might take place.
Authors:
Publication Date:
Feb 15, 1979
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-79-138193
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: New Sci.; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 81:1142
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; OZONE; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; ATMOSPHERES; CLIMATES; ECOLOGY; ULTRAVIOLET RADIATION; ELECTROMAGNETIC RADIATION; RADIATIONS; 560151* - Radiation Effects on Animals- Man; 560150 - Radiation Effects on Animals
OSTI ID:
6008659
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: NWSCA
Submitting Site:
TIC
Size:
Pages: 474-476
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Gribbin, J. Disappearing threat to ozone. United Kingdom: N. p., 1979. Web.
Gribbin, J. Disappearing threat to ozone. United Kingdom.
Gribbin, J. 1979. "Disappearing threat to ozone." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_6008659,
title = {Disappearing threat to ozone}
author = {Gribbin, J}
abstractNote = {Concern that human activities might disturb the dynamic natural equilibrium of the ozone layer has stemmed from the fact that this layer plays a key part in the ecology of the earth by absorbing harmful ultraviolet radiation which would otherwise penetrate to the ground. Apparently, however, a decline of as much at 15% in total global ozone would have very little effect on climate. A 50% reduction would produce a marked cooling of the stratosphere at 40 km altitude over the tropics, but barely detectable changes in temperature and rainfall in the lower atmosphere. Therefore, biological effects of more uv light at ground level is the only hazard associated with ozone depletion on the scale which might take place.}
journal = {New Sci.; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {81:1142}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1979}
month = {Feb}
}