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Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in patients with Parkinson's disease

Journal Article:

Abstract

The purpose of this study was to determine functional changes in the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia in Parkinson's disease (PD). Cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO/sub 2/) were determined using 0-15 positron emission tomography in 10 PD patients and five age-matched healthy volunteers. There was a tendency among PD patients towards a decreased CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ in the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia. These values were significantly lower in the frontal cortex in the PD group than the control group. There was no difference in OEF between the groups. A more decreased cerebral oxygen metabolism was observed in patients staged as severer on the scale of Hoehn and Yahr. There was no correlation between cerebral oxygen metabolism and tremor, rigidity, or bradykinesis. A decreased cerebral oxygen metabolism was associated with mental disorders, such as depression, hallucination, and dementia. These results may provide an important clue for the understanding of mesocortical dopaminergic pathway and the relationship between PD and dementia. (N.K.).
Publication Date:
Oct 01, 1988
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
JPN-89-008308; EDB-89-087246
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: No To Shinkei; (Japan); Journal Volume: 40:10
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CEREBRAL CORTEX; POSITRON COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY; OXYGEN 15; BLOOD FLOW; BREATH; MENTAL DISORDERS; METABOLISM; PATIENTS; BETA DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BETA-PLUS DECAY RADIOISOTOPES; BODY; BRAIN; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM; CEREBRUM; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES; EMISSION COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY; EVEN-ODD NUCLEI; ISOTOPES; LIGHT NUCLEI; MINUTES LIVING RADIOISOTOPES; NERVOUS SYSTEM; NUCLEI; ORGANS; OXYGEN ISOTOPES; RADIOISOTOPES; TOMOGRAPHY; 550601* - Medicine- Unsealed Radionuclides in Diagnostics
OSTI ID:
5981386
Research Organizations:
Nippon Medical School, Tokyo (Japan)
Country of Origin:
Japan
Language:
Japanese
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: NOTOA
Submitting Site:
JPN
Size:
Pages: 979-985
Announcement Date:
Feb 01, 1989

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Kitamura, Shin, Ujike, Takashi, Kuroki, Soemu, Sakamoto, Shizuki, Soeda, Toshiyuki, Terashi, Akiro, and Iio, Masaaki. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in patients with Parkinson's disease. Japan: N. p., 1988. Web.
Kitamura, Shin, Ujike, Takashi, Kuroki, Soemu, Sakamoto, Shizuki, Soeda, Toshiyuki, Terashi, Akiro, & Iio, Masaaki. Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in patients with Parkinson's disease. Japan.
Kitamura, Shin, Ujike, Takashi, Kuroki, Soemu, Sakamoto, Shizuki, Soeda, Toshiyuki, Terashi, Akiro, and Iio, Masaaki. 1988. "Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in patients with Parkinson's disease." Japan.
@misc{etde_5981386,
title = {Cerebral blood flow and oxygen metabolism in patients with Parkinson's disease}
author = {Kitamura, Shin, Ujike, Takashi, Kuroki, Soemu, Sakamoto, Shizuki, Soeda, Toshiyuki, Terashi, Akiro, and Iio, Masaaki}
abstractNote = {The purpose of this study was to determine functional changes in the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia in Parkinson's disease (PD). Cerebral blood flow (CBF), oxygen extraction fraction (OEF), and cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO/sub 2/) were determined using 0-15 positron emission tomography in 10 PD patients and five age-matched healthy volunteers. There was a tendency among PD patients towards a decreased CBF and CMRO/sub 2/ in the cerebral cortex and basal ganglia. These values were significantly lower in the frontal cortex in the PD group than the control group. There was no difference in OEF between the groups. A more decreased cerebral oxygen metabolism was observed in patients staged as severer on the scale of Hoehn and Yahr. There was no correlation between cerebral oxygen metabolism and tremor, rigidity, or bradykinesis. A decreased cerebral oxygen metabolism was associated with mental disorders, such as depression, hallucination, and dementia. These results may provide an important clue for the understanding of mesocortical dopaminergic pathway and the relationship between PD and dementia. (N.K.).}
journal = {No To Shinkei; (Japan)}
volume = {40:10}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Japan}
year = {1988}
month = {Oct}
}