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Implications of climate change scenarios for soil erosion potential in the USA

Journal Article:

Abstract

Atmospheric general circulation models (GCMs) project that increasing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases may result in global changes in temperature and precipitation over the next 40-100 years. Equilibrium climate scenarios from four GCMs run under doubled CO[sub 2] conditions were examined for their effect on the climatic potential for sheet and rill erosion in the conterminous USA. Changes in the mean annual rainfall factor (R) in the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) were calculated for each cropland, pastureland and rangeland sample point in the 1987 National Resources Inventory. Projected annual precipitation changes were assumed to be from differences in either storm frequency or storm intensity. With all other USLE factors held constant these changes in R translated to changes in the sheet and rill erosion national average of +2 to +16 per cent in croplands, -2 to +10 per cent in pasturelands and 5 to +22 per cent in rangelands under the eight scenarios. Land with erosion rates above the soil loss tolerance (T) level and land classified as highly erodible also increased slightly. These results show the range of sensitivity of soil erosion potential by water under projected climate change scenarios. However, actual changes in soil erosion could be  More>>
Authors:
Phillips, D L; White, D; Johnson, B [1] 
  1. US EPA, Corvallis, OR (United States). Environmental Research Laboratory
Publication Date:
Jul 01, 1993
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
CLA-93-110404; EDB-93-159969
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Land Degradation and Rehabilitation; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 4:2
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; EROSION; FORECASTING; SOILS; USA; CLIMATIC CHANGE; AGRICULTURE; CARBON DIOXIDE; GENERAL CIRCULATION MODELS; LAND USE; RAIN; ATMOSPHERIC PRECIPITATIONS; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CHALCOGENIDES; DEVELOPED COUNTRIES; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; NORTH AMERICA; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; 540120* - Environment, Atmospheric- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (1990-); 540210 - Environment, Terrestrial- Basic Studies- (1990-)
OSTI ID:
5980849
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: LDREE7
Submitting Site:
CLA
Size:
Pages: 61-72
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Phillips, D L, White, D, and Johnson, B. Implications of climate change scenarios for soil erosion potential in the USA. United Kingdom: N. p., 1993. Web. doi:10.1002/ldr.3400040202.
Phillips, D L, White, D, & Johnson, B. Implications of climate change scenarios for soil erosion potential in the USA. United Kingdom. doi:10.1002/ldr.3400040202.
Phillips, D L, White, D, and Johnson, B. 1993. "Implications of climate change scenarios for soil erosion potential in the USA." United Kingdom. doi:10.1002/ldr.3400040202. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1002/ldr.3400040202.
@misc{etde_5980849,
title = {Implications of climate change scenarios for soil erosion potential in the USA}
author = {Phillips, D L, White, D, and Johnson, B}
abstractNote = {Atmospheric general circulation models (GCMs) project that increasing atmospheric concentrations of greenhouse gases may result in global changes in temperature and precipitation over the next 40-100 years. Equilibrium climate scenarios from four GCMs run under doubled CO[sub 2] conditions were examined for their effect on the climatic potential for sheet and rill erosion in the conterminous USA. Changes in the mean annual rainfall factor (R) in the Universal Soil Loss Equation (USLE) were calculated for each cropland, pastureland and rangeland sample point in the 1987 National Resources Inventory. Projected annual precipitation changes were assumed to be from differences in either storm frequency or storm intensity. With all other USLE factors held constant these changes in R translated to changes in the sheet and rill erosion national average of +2 to +16 per cent in croplands, -2 to +10 per cent in pasturelands and 5 to +22 per cent in rangelands under the eight scenarios. Land with erosion rates above the soil loss tolerance (T) level and land classified as highly erodible also increased slightly. These results show the range of sensitivity of soil erosion potential by water under projected climate change scenarios. However, actual changes in soil erosion could be mitigated by management practices, or possibly by increased crop growth and residue production under higher atmospheric CO[sub 2] concentrations.}
doi = {10.1002/ldr.3400040202}
journal = {Land Degradation and Rehabilitation; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {4:2}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1993}
month = {Jul}
}