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Lead in soils, plants and animals

Journal Article:

Abstract

The toxicity of lead for plants is small, except in the case of water cultures. Animals can absorb more lead without toxic effect than was previously expected. This applies to acute poisoning as well as chronic poisoning. As a result of experiments over many years (Allcroft and Blaxter, 1950) the possibility of chronic lead poisoning has been found to be minute. Rations containing 240 mg lead/kg dried fodder, given daily over a period of three years, did not cause any poisoning at all in cattle thus fed. Where lead poisoning did take place, it was observed that the ratio of lead in the dried fodder was > 1000 mg/kg; the proportion was generally much higher. In normal cases grass contains only 5 to 15 mg lead/kg. The total lead content of samples from arable land was 10 to 25 mg/kg soil. For grassland on peat or clay the amount was slightly higher. The influence on the lead status of soils and plants of fertilizing with compost or copper slag flour, both containing a small percentage of lead, proved to be negligible. It is definite that in normal use, these fertilizers cannot cause any danger for either plant or animal. 24  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1955
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-85-056432
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Landbouwkd. Tijdschr.; (Netherlands); Journal Volume: 67
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; 54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; LEAD; ENVIRONMENTAL TRANSPORT; TOXICITY; ACUTE EXPOSURE; BIOLOGICAL ACCUMULATION; CATTLE; CHRONIC EXPOSURE; ECOLOGICAL CONCENTRATION; QUANTITY RATIO; SOIL CHEMISTRY; SOILS; TERRESTRIAL ECOSYSTEMS; ANIMALS; CHEMISTRY; DOMESTIC ANIMALS; ECOSYSTEMS; ELEMENTS; MAMMALS; MASS TRANSFER; METALS; RUMINANTS; VERTEBRATES; 560305* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Vertebrates- (-1987); 560303 - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Plants- (-1987); 510200 - Environment, Terrestrial- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (-1989); 520200 - Environment, Aquatic- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (-1989)
OSTI ID:
5970828
Research Organizations:
Landbouwkundig Bureau voor Sporenelement-meststoffen te Arnhem, Netherlands
Country of Origin:
Netherlands
Language:
Dutch
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: LATIA
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 153-164
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Scheltinga, H. Lead in soils, plants and animals. Netherlands: N. p., 1955. Web.
Scheltinga, H. Lead in soils, plants and animals. Netherlands.
Scheltinga, H. 1955. "Lead in soils, plants and animals." Netherlands.
@misc{etde_5970828,
title = {Lead in soils, plants and animals}
author = {Scheltinga, H}
abstractNote = {The toxicity of lead for plants is small, except in the case of water cultures. Animals can absorb more lead without toxic effect than was previously expected. This applies to acute poisoning as well as chronic poisoning. As a result of experiments over many years (Allcroft and Blaxter, 1950) the possibility of chronic lead poisoning has been found to be minute. Rations containing 240 mg lead/kg dried fodder, given daily over a period of three years, did not cause any poisoning at all in cattle thus fed. Where lead poisoning did take place, it was observed that the ratio of lead in the dried fodder was > 1000 mg/kg; the proportion was generally much higher. In normal cases grass contains only 5 to 15 mg lead/kg. The total lead content of samples from arable land was 10 to 25 mg/kg soil. For grassland on peat or clay the amount was slightly higher. The influence on the lead status of soils and plants of fertilizing with compost or copper slag flour, both containing a small percentage of lead, proved to be negligible. It is definite that in normal use, these fertilizers cannot cause any danger for either plant or animal. 24 references, 3 tables.}
journal = {Landbouwkd. Tijdschr.; (Netherlands)}
volume = {67}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Netherlands}
year = {1955}
month = {Jan}
}