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Effect of vegetation in reducing carbon monoxide

Journal Article:

Abstract

Carbon monoxide is a product of incomplete combustion. Because almost all of this gas is produced by motor vehicles, it is considered to have a line rather than a stationary point source. Greatest concentrations of this lethal gas correspond to periods of peak traffic volume and congestion; therefore, there are two daily periods of maxima and minima. Carbon monoxide cannot be detected by sight or smell. For this reason, this gas is especially deadly. During the summer of 1975, a study involving carbon monoxide concentrations at selected sites in Sendai was undertaken in conjunction with an ongoing investigation of urban pollution under the directorship of Professor Toshio Noh of Tohoku University. This study was made possible by a grant from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. 5 references, 5 figures, 1 table.
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1977
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-86-081983
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Sci. Rep. Tohoku Univ. Seri.; (Japan); Journal Volume: 27:1
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; CARBON MONOXIDE; FOLIAR UPTAKE; AUTOMOBILES; EXHAUST GASES; EXPERIMENTAL DATA; JAPAN; PLANTS; ROADS; SHRUBS; TREES; WIND; ASIA; CARBON COMPOUNDS; CARBON OXIDES; CHALCOGENIDES; DATA; FLUIDS; GASEOUS WASTES; GASES; INFORMATION; NUMERICAL DATA; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; UPTAKE; VEHICLES; WASTES; 560303* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Plants- (-1987)
OSTI ID:
5963436
Research Organizations:
California State Univ., Long Beach
Country of Origin:
Japan
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: XY506
Submitting Site:
JMT
Size:
Pages: 37-45
Announcement Date:
May 01, 1986

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Kimura, J C. Effect of vegetation in reducing carbon monoxide. Japan: N. p., 1977. Web.
Kimura, J C. Effect of vegetation in reducing carbon monoxide. Japan.
Kimura, J C. 1977. "Effect of vegetation in reducing carbon monoxide." Japan.
@misc{etde_5963436,
title = {Effect of vegetation in reducing carbon monoxide}
author = {Kimura, J C}
abstractNote = {Carbon monoxide is a product of incomplete combustion. Because almost all of this gas is produced by motor vehicles, it is considered to have a line rather than a stationary point source. Greatest concentrations of this lethal gas correspond to periods of peak traffic volume and congestion; therefore, there are two daily periods of maxima and minima. Carbon monoxide cannot be detected by sight or smell. For this reason, this gas is especially deadly. During the summer of 1975, a study involving carbon monoxide concentrations at selected sites in Sendai was undertaken in conjunction with an ongoing investigation of urban pollution under the directorship of Professor Toshio Noh of Tohoku University. This study was made possible by a grant from the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science. 5 references, 5 figures, 1 table.}
journal = {Sci. Rep. Tohoku Univ. Seri.; (Japan)}
volume = {27:1}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Japan}
year = {1977}
month = {Jan}
}