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Intracerebral hemorrhage in brain tumors

Journal Article:

Abstract

A series of 16 cases of intracerebral hemorrhage associated with brain tumors are described. The literature is reviewed and the incidence of these cases is reported to be low, but we had clinically encountered these cases more commonly than reported, since CT was introduced to the neurosurgical field as a diagnostic aid. The presenting symptoms were those of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage or brain tumor. The intracerebral hemorrhage associated with brain tumor may mask the cause of bleeding and confuse the diagnosis. The majority of the tumor causing the intracerebral hemorrhage are highly malignant as glioblastoma or metastatic brain tumor, but there are some benign tumors such as pituitary adenoma, hemangioblastoma, benign astrocytoma and meningioma, which would have good survival rates if discovered early. The mechanisms of massive hemorrhage with brain tumor are not clear. From pathological findings of our cases and other reports, the mechanism seems to be due to the vascular endothelial proliferation with subsequent obliteration of the lumen of the vessel. Thin walled, poorly formed vessels in tumor may also become distorted with growth of the tumor and these may easily rupture and bleed. Necrosis with subsequent loss of vessel support may be a factor in production of  More>>
Authors:
Fujita, K; Matsumoto, S [1] 
  1. Kobe Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine
Publication Date:
Oct 01, 1980
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
AIX-12-635216; EDB-82-022925
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Neurol. Surg. (Tokyo); (Japan); Journal Volume: 8:10
Subject:
62 RADIOLOGY AND NUCLEAR MEDICINE; CEREBRUM; CARCINOMAS; CAT SCANNING; HEMORRHAGE; AUTOPSY; NERVOUS SYSTEM DISEASES; PATIENTS; BODY; BRAIN; CENTRAL NERVOUS SYSTEM; COMPUTERIZED TOMOGRAPHY; DIAGNOSTIC TECHNIQUES; DISEASES; IMAGE PROCESSING; NEOPLASMS; NERVOUS SYSTEM; ORGANS; PATHOLOGICAL CHANGES; PROCESSING; SYMPTOMS; TOMOGRAPHY; 550602* - Medicine- External Radiation in Diagnostics- (1980-)
OSTI ID:
5878047
Country of Origin:
Japan
Language:
Japanese
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: NOKGB
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
Pages: 929-934
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Fujita, K, and Matsumoto, S. Intracerebral hemorrhage in brain tumors. Japan: N. p., 1980. Web.
Fujita, K, & Matsumoto, S. Intracerebral hemorrhage in brain tumors. Japan.
Fujita, K, and Matsumoto, S. 1980. "Intracerebral hemorrhage in brain tumors." Japan.
@misc{etde_5878047,
title = {Intracerebral hemorrhage in brain tumors}
author = {Fujita, K, and Matsumoto, S}
abstractNote = {A series of 16 cases of intracerebral hemorrhage associated with brain tumors are described. The literature is reviewed and the incidence of these cases is reported to be low, but we had clinically encountered these cases more commonly than reported, since CT was introduced to the neurosurgical field as a diagnostic aid. The presenting symptoms were those of spontaneous intracerebral hemorrhage or brain tumor. The intracerebral hemorrhage associated with brain tumor may mask the cause of bleeding and confuse the diagnosis. The majority of the tumor causing the intracerebral hemorrhage are highly malignant as glioblastoma or metastatic brain tumor, but there are some benign tumors such as pituitary adenoma, hemangioblastoma, benign astrocytoma and meningioma, which would have good survival rates if discovered early. The mechanisms of massive hemorrhage with brain tumor are not clear. From pathological findings of our cases and other reports, the mechanism seems to be due to the vascular endothelial proliferation with subsequent obliteration of the lumen of the vessel. Thin walled, poorly formed vessels in tumor may also become distorted with growth of the tumor and these may easily rupture and bleed. Necrosis with subsequent loss of vessel support may be a factor in production of hemorrhage. Radiation therapy may be a predisposing factor. Children are rarely involved in these cases. The prognosis in the majority of cases would seen to be poor, since the majority of the tumor are highly malignant and most such patients are seen by the neurosurgeon some time after the hemorrhage has accomplished its fatal mischief.}
journal = {Neurol. Surg. (Tokyo); (Japan)}
volume = {8:10}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Japan}
year = {1980}
month = {Oct}
}