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Effect of molybdenum on the severity of toxicity symptoms in flax induced by an excess of either manganese, zinc, copper, nickel or cobalt in the nutrient solution

Journal Article:

Abstract

The addition of molybdenum to solutions containing an excess of either manganese, zinc, copper, nickel or cobalt respectively, resulted in decreases in the severity of iron deficiency symptoms which normally occurred when flax was grown in solutions containing the same concentrations of any of these elements, but without molybdenum. The efficacy of molybdenum in this regard increased with increasing concentration up to 25 parts per million. However, concentrations of 0.5 to 2 parts per million of molybdenum had little effect on the severity of iron deficiency symptoms at the concentrations of heavy metals used. Molybdenum 5, 10 or 25 parts per million also retarded the date of appearance and reduced the severity of lower leaf necrosis which is another characteristic symptom of the presence of excess manganese (25 to 100 parts per million) in the nutrient solution. It is concluded that an essential function of molybdenum is intimately associated with the regulation of the deleterious effect of manganese, zinc, copper, nickel or cobalt on the physiological availability of iron to the plant. 46 references, 3 figures.
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1947
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-85-074989
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: J. Aust. Inst. Agric. Sci.; (Australia); Journal Volume: 13
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; COBALT; TOXICITY; COPPER; IRON; BIOLOGICAL AVAILABILITY; MANGANESE; MOLYBDENUM; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; NICKEL; ZINC; DOSE-RESPONSE RELATIONSHIPS; FLAX PLANTS; INHIBITION; METABOLISM; NUTRITIONAL DEFICIENCY; RESPONSE MODIFYING FACTORS; SYMPTOMS; ELEMENTS; METALS; PLANTS; TRANSITION ELEMENTS; 560303* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Plants- (-1987)
OSTI ID:
5853498
Research Organizations:
Dept. of Agriculture, Victoria, Australia
Country of Origin:
Australia
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: JAUSA
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 180-186
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Millikan, C R. Effect of molybdenum on the severity of toxicity symptoms in flax induced by an excess of either manganese, zinc, copper, nickel or cobalt in the nutrient solution. Australia: N. p., 1947. Web.
Millikan, C R. Effect of molybdenum on the severity of toxicity symptoms in flax induced by an excess of either manganese, zinc, copper, nickel or cobalt in the nutrient solution. Australia.
Millikan, C R. 1947. "Effect of molybdenum on the severity of toxicity symptoms in flax induced by an excess of either manganese, zinc, copper, nickel or cobalt in the nutrient solution." Australia.
@misc{etde_5853498,
title = {Effect of molybdenum on the severity of toxicity symptoms in flax induced by an excess of either manganese, zinc, copper, nickel or cobalt in the nutrient solution}
author = {Millikan, C R}
abstractNote = {The addition of molybdenum to solutions containing an excess of either manganese, zinc, copper, nickel or cobalt respectively, resulted in decreases in the severity of iron deficiency symptoms which normally occurred when flax was grown in solutions containing the same concentrations of any of these elements, but without molybdenum. The efficacy of molybdenum in this regard increased with increasing concentration up to 25 parts per million. However, concentrations of 0.5 to 2 parts per million of molybdenum had little effect on the severity of iron deficiency symptoms at the concentrations of heavy metals used. Molybdenum 5, 10 or 25 parts per million also retarded the date of appearance and reduced the severity of lower leaf necrosis which is another characteristic symptom of the presence of excess manganese (25 to 100 parts per million) in the nutrient solution. It is concluded that an essential function of molybdenum is intimately associated with the regulation of the deleterious effect of manganese, zinc, copper, nickel or cobalt on the physiological availability of iron to the plant. 46 references, 3 figures.}
journal = {J. Aust. Inst. Agric. Sci.; (Australia)}
volume = {13}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Australia}
year = {1947}
month = {Jan}
}