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Ozone injury to some Japanese woody plant species in summer

Journal Article:

Abstract

Ozone is an important constituent of photochemical oxidant smog. This paper reveals the semiquantitative responses of various Japanese woody plant species to ozone (0.25 ppm). Plant species examined in this investigation include four coniferous trees, eleven evergreen broad-leaf trees, and twenty-one deciduous broad-leaf trees or shrubs. Generally, plants having thin leaves were susceptible. The plant species with higher activity of photosynthesis appeared to be more susceptible. As a whole, evergreen broad-leaf trees could be said to be more resistant to ozone than deciduous broad-leaf trees.
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1972
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-85-074961
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Nippon Rin Gakkai-Shi; (Japan); Journal Volume: 54:7
Subject:
63 RADIATION, THERMAL, AND OTHER ENVIRON. POLLUTANT EFFECTS ON LIVING ORGS. AND BIOL. MAT.; OZONE; BIOLOGICAL EFFECTS; AIR POLLUTION; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; SENSITIVITY; SMOG; TREES; PLANTS; POLLUTION; 560303* - Chemicals Metabolism & Toxicology- Plants- (-1987)
OSTI ID:
5776476
Research Organizations:
Nagoya Univ., Nagoya, Japan
Country of Origin:
Japan
Language:
Japanese
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: NIRKA
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 226-229
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Kadota, M, and Ohta, K. Ozone injury to some Japanese woody plant species in summer. Japan: N. p., 1972. Web.
Kadota, M, & Ohta, K. Ozone injury to some Japanese woody plant species in summer. Japan.
Kadota, M, and Ohta, K. 1972. "Ozone injury to some Japanese woody plant species in summer." Japan.
@misc{etde_5776476,
title = {Ozone injury to some Japanese woody plant species in summer}
author = {Kadota, M, and Ohta, K}
abstractNote = {Ozone is an important constituent of photochemical oxidant smog. This paper reveals the semiquantitative responses of various Japanese woody plant species to ozone (0.25 ppm). Plant species examined in this investigation include four coniferous trees, eleven evergreen broad-leaf trees, and twenty-one deciduous broad-leaf trees or shrubs. Generally, plants having thin leaves were susceptible. The plant species with higher activity of photosynthesis appeared to be more susceptible. As a whole, evergreen broad-leaf trees could be said to be more resistant to ozone than deciduous broad-leaf trees.}
journal = {Nippon Rin Gakkai-Shi; (Japan)}
volume = {54:7}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Japan}
year = {1972}
month = {Jan}
}