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Air-sea exchange of carbon dioxide

Technical Report:

Abstract

The greenhouse gas carbon dioxide is emitted by anthropogenic activities. The oceans presumably serve as a net sink for 17 to 39% of these emissions. The objective of this project is to quantify more accurately the locality, seasonality and magnitude of the net air-sea flux of CO2 with emphasis on the South Atlantic Ocean. In situ measurements of the fugacity of CO2 in surface water and marine air, of total dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity and of air-sea exchange of CO2 have been made at four Atlantic crossings, in the Southern Ocean, in a Norwegian fjord and in the Dutch coastal zone. Skin temperature was detected during several of the cruises. The data collected in the course of the project support and refine previous findings. Variability of dissolved CO2 in surface water is related in a complex way to biological and physical factors. The carbonate equilibria cause dissolved gaseous CO2 to react in an intricate manner to disturbances. Dissolved gaseous CO2 hardly ever attains equilibrium with the atmospheric CO2 content by means of air-sea exchange, before a new disturbance occurs. Surface water fCO2 changes could be separated in those caused by seasonal warming and those by biological uptake in a Southern  More>>
Authors:
Bakker, D C.E.; De Baar, H J.W.; De Jong, E; Koning, F A [1] 
  1. Netherlands Institute for Sea Research NIOZ, Den Burg Texel (Netherlands)
Publication Date:
Dec 31, 1995
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
NOP-MLK-410100024
Reference Number:
SCA: 540110; 540310; PA: ECN-98:0E0445; EDB-98:025770; SN: 98001916867
Resource Relation:
Other Information: DN: The title study has been carried out within the framework of the Dutch National Research Programme on Global Air Pollution and Climate Change (NRP-GAPCC or NOP-MLK, abbreviated in Dutch); PBD: 1995
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; CARBON DIOXIDE; CARBON SINKS; AIR-WATER INTERACTIONS; SEAS; ATLANTIC OCEAN; COASTAL WATERS; NORWAY; NETHERLANDS; DISSOLVED GASES; UPTAKE; DATA PROCESSING; ALGAE; WATER CURRENTS; FLUORESCENCE; SALINITY; MEETINGS; PLANKTON; IRON; DRAWDOWN; CHLOROPHYLL; WIND; VELOCITY; ACID NEUTRALIZING CAPACITY
OSTI ID:
574812
Research Organizations:
NRP Programme Office, Bilthoven (Netherlands)
Country of Origin:
Netherlands
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
TRN: NL98E0445
Availability:
Available from NRP Programme Office, P.O. Box 1, 3720 BA Bilthoven (Netherlands)
Submitting Site:
ECN
Size:
103 p.
Announcement Date:
Mar 25, 1998

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Bakker, D C.E., De Baar, H J.W., De Jong, E, and Koning, F A. Air-sea exchange of carbon dioxide. Netherlands: N. p., 1995. Web.
Bakker, D C.E., De Baar, H J.W., De Jong, E, & Koning, F A. Air-sea exchange of carbon dioxide. Netherlands.
Bakker, D C.E., De Baar, H J.W., De Jong, E, and Koning, F A. 1995. "Air-sea exchange of carbon dioxide." Netherlands.
@misc{etde_574812,
title = {Air-sea exchange of carbon dioxide}
author = {Bakker, D C.E., De Baar, H J.W., De Jong, E, and Koning, F A}
abstractNote = {The greenhouse gas carbon dioxide is emitted by anthropogenic activities. The oceans presumably serve as a net sink for 17 to 39% of these emissions. The objective of this project is to quantify more accurately the locality, seasonality and magnitude of the net air-sea flux of CO2 with emphasis on the South Atlantic Ocean. In situ measurements of the fugacity of CO2 in surface water and marine air, of total dissolved inorganic carbon, alkalinity and of air-sea exchange of CO2 have been made at four Atlantic crossings, in the Southern Ocean, in a Norwegian fjord and in the Dutch coastal zone. Skin temperature was detected during several of the cruises. The data collected in the course of the project support and refine previous findings. Variability of dissolved CO2 in surface water is related in a complex way to biological and physical factors. The carbonate equilibria cause dissolved gaseous CO2 to react in an intricate manner to disturbances. Dissolved gaseous CO2 hardly ever attains equilibrium with the atmospheric CO2 content by means of air-sea exchange, before a new disturbance occurs. Surface water fCO2 changes could be separated in those caused by seasonal warming and those by biological uptake in a Southern Ocean spring. Incorporation of a thermal skin effect and a change of the wind speed interval strongly increased the small net oceanic uptake for the area. The Atlantic crossings point to a relationship between water mass history and surface water CO2 characteristics. In particular, current flow and related heat fluxes leave their imprint on the concentration dissolved gaseous CO2 and on air-sea exchange. In the Dutch coastal zone hydrography and inorganic carbon characteristics of the water were heterogeneous, which yielded variable air-sea exchange of CO2. figs., tabs., refs.}
place = {Netherlands}
year = {1995}
month = {Dec}
}