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Nuclear energy and the fossil fuels

Journal Article:

Abstract

The energy phenomenon of the first half of this century has been the increase in the use of petroleum and natural gas as fuels. World demand for petroleum energy has been increasing at the rate of 11% per yr. This demand is unsustainable, for the supply, as with any exhaustible resource, is limited. The continental energy policy is essentially one of integrating the North American supply and demand picture for the fossil fuels, using oil and gas from the interior of the continent to supply demand from the interior and using overseas supplies, up the limit of national security, for energy users farthest removed from these sources. The economics of expensive pipeline transportation as against cheap supertankers dictates this policy. Beyond any shadow of a doubt, the fuel of the future will be nuclear, and for this century almost entirely the energy of fission rather than of fusion. Recent estimates suggest that as much as 50% of the energy for the U.S. will be nuclear by the year 2,000, and for Canada the more modest National Energy Board estimate holds that in 1990, 35% of Canadian electric generation will be by nuclear power reactors concentrated in the fuel-starved province of  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1970
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-82-054052
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Trans. R. Soc. Can.; (Canada); Journal Volume: 8
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 02 PETROLEUM; 03 NATURAL GAS; 11 NUCLEAR FUEL CYCLE AND FUEL MATERIALS; FOSSIL FUELS; DEMAND; NUCLEAR ENERGY; CANADA; COAL; COST; ENERGY POLICY; FISSION; NATURAL GAS; PETROLEUM; PIPELINES; SECURITY; TANKER SHIPS; TRANSPORT; USA; CARBONACEOUS MATERIALS; ENERGY; ENERGY SOURCES; FLUIDS; FUEL GAS; FUELS; GAS FUELS; GASES; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; MATERIALS; NORTH AMERICA; NUCLEAR REACTIONS; SHIPS; 015000* - Coal, Lignite, & Peat- Economic, Industrial, & Business Aspects; 020700 - Petroleum- Economics, Industrial, & Business Aspects; 030600 - Natural Gas- Economic, Industrial, & Business Aspects; 051000 - Nuclear Fuels- Economic, Industrial, & Business Aspects
OSTI ID:
5708638
Research Organizations:
Alberta Univ
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: TRSCA
Submitting Site:
TUL
Size:
Pages: 335-359
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Folinsbee, R E. Nuclear energy and the fossil fuels. Canada: N. p., 1970. Web.
Folinsbee, R E. Nuclear energy and the fossil fuels. Canada.
Folinsbee, R E. 1970. "Nuclear energy and the fossil fuels." Canada.
@misc{etde_5708638,
title = {Nuclear energy and the fossil fuels}
author = {Folinsbee, R E}
abstractNote = {The energy phenomenon of the first half of this century has been the increase in the use of petroleum and natural gas as fuels. World demand for petroleum energy has been increasing at the rate of 11% per yr. This demand is unsustainable, for the supply, as with any exhaustible resource, is limited. The continental energy policy is essentially one of integrating the North American supply and demand picture for the fossil fuels, using oil and gas from the interior of the continent to supply demand from the interior and using overseas supplies, up the limit of national security, for energy users farthest removed from these sources. The economics of expensive pipeline transportation as against cheap supertankers dictates this policy. Beyond any shadow of a doubt, the fuel of the future will be nuclear, and for this century almost entirely the energy of fission rather than of fusion. Recent estimates suggest that as much as 50% of the energy for the U.S. will be nuclear by the year 2,000, and for Canada the more modest National Energy Board estimate holds that in 1990, 35% of Canadian electric generation will be by nuclear power reactors concentrated in the fuel-starved province of Ontario. (17 refs.)}
journal = {Trans. R. Soc. Can.; (Canada)}
volume = {8}
journal type = {AC}
place = {Canada}
year = {1970}
month = {Jan}
}