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The new geopolitics of energy

Abstract

This path-breaking study attempts to define a new international dimension to energy policy that takes account of the dramatic political changes since the oil crises of the 1970s. This `new geopolitics of energy` is creative rather than defensive, aligned to market-oriented development rather than state management. But governments have a role in promoting stable international conditions for trade and investment energy, which in turn contribute to wider political stability; the development of more widely acceptable options for nuclear power; coordinated international action to mitigate the risks of climate change and other environmental impacts. (author)
Publication Date:
Dec 31, 1996
Product Type:
Book
Reference Number:
SCA: 290200; PA: GB-97:053190; EDB-98:017588; SN: 98001908087
Resource Relation:
Other Information: DN: Price Pound 14.95; PBD: 1996
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING AND POLICY; POLITICAL ASPECTS; ENERGY DEMAND; GLOBAL ASPECTS; PETROLEUM INDUSTRY; MIDDLE EAST; ASIA; RUSSIAN FEDERATION; CLIMATIC CHANGE; ENERGY POLICY; NUCLEAR POWER
OSTI ID:
564637
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISBN 1 899658 12 2; TRN: GB9753190
Submitting Site:
GB
Size:
196 p.
Announcement Date:
Mar 03, 1998

Citation Formats

Mitchell, John, Beck, Peter, and Grubb, Michael. The new geopolitics of energy. United Kingdom: N. p., 1996. Web.
Mitchell, John, Beck, Peter, & Grubb, Michael. The new geopolitics of energy. United Kingdom.
Mitchell, John, Beck, Peter, and Grubb, Michael. 1996. "The new geopolitics of energy." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_564637,
title = {The new geopolitics of energy}
author = {Mitchell, John, Beck, Peter, and Grubb, Michael}
abstractNote = {This path-breaking study attempts to define a new international dimension to energy policy that takes account of the dramatic political changes since the oil crises of the 1970s. This `new geopolitics of energy` is creative rather than defensive, aligned to market-oriented development rather than state management. But governments have a role in promoting stable international conditions for trade and investment energy, which in turn contribute to wider political stability; the development of more widely acceptable options for nuclear power; coordinated international action to mitigate the risks of climate change and other environmental impacts. (author)}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1996}
month = {Dec}
}