You need JavaScript to view this

Ice forces on marine structures. Volume 2, discussion

Technical Report:

Abstract

A comprehensive state-of-the-art review is provided of the current methodologies in use for estimating the impact of ice forces on various kinds of marine structures: vertical sided or sloping stationary structures, floating structures, and artificial islands. Introductory chapters present ice statistics from selected Canadian marine regions, the failure modes and mechanical properties of ice, and general principles of ice/structure interactions. The methods for calculating ice loads are basically alternative methods for predicting the behavior of ice under different loading conditions; as such, none of the models have been successful in predicting the behavior of ice under all loading conditions. Currently the only reliable method for accurately predicting ice forces on marine structures is to use large-scale empirical data for ice of the same state as that predicted for design. Extrapolation from ice behavioral data at a smaller scale or ice of a different state is generally required. In comparison to current uncertainties, reasonably accurate estimates of upper bound static ice forces can be made, and a design approach using this upper bound force is appropriate for very massive rigid structures and in designing for overall global stability. The periodicity of ice forces also needs to be considered in terms of  More>>
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1988
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
CMEL-W62-11-88-5-2E; MICROLOG-89-02031
Reference Number:
CANM-89-002668; EDB-89-133718
Subject:
42 ENGINEERING; OFFSHORE PLATFORMS; DYNAMIC LOADS; SHIPS; CALCULATION METHODS; CANADA; ICE; MATHEMATICAL MODELS; MECHANICAL PROPERTIES; NORTH AMERICA; 423000* - Engineering- Marine Engineering- (1980-)
OSTI ID:
5635078
Research Organizations:
C.M.E.L. Enterprises Ltd., Spencerville, ON (Canada)
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Availability:
Public Works Canada, Information Research Library Services, Sir Charles Tupper Bldg., Confederation Heights, Ottawa, ON, CAN K1A 0M2; $N/C; MF CANMET/TID, Energy, Mines and Resources Canada, 555 Booth St., Ottawa, Ont., Canada K1A 0G1; $10 CAN.
Submitting Site:
CANM
Size:
Pages: 436
Announcement Date:

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Marcellus, R W, Morrison, T B, Allyn, N F.B., Croasdale, K R, Iyer, H S, and Tseng, J. Ice forces on marine structures. Volume 2, discussion. Canada: N. p., 1988. Web.
Marcellus, R W, Morrison, T B, Allyn, N F.B., Croasdale, K R, Iyer, H S, & Tseng, J. Ice forces on marine structures. Volume 2, discussion. Canada.
Marcellus, R W, Morrison, T B, Allyn, N F.B., Croasdale, K R, Iyer, H S, and Tseng, J. 1988. "Ice forces on marine structures. Volume 2, discussion." Canada.
@misc{etde_5635078,
title = {Ice forces on marine structures. Volume 2, discussion}
author = {Marcellus, R W, Morrison, T B, Allyn, N F.B., Croasdale, K R, Iyer, H S, and Tseng, J}
abstractNote = {A comprehensive state-of-the-art review is provided of the current methodologies in use for estimating the impact of ice forces on various kinds of marine structures: vertical sided or sloping stationary structures, floating structures, and artificial islands. Introductory chapters present ice statistics from selected Canadian marine regions, the failure modes and mechanical properties of ice, and general principles of ice/structure interactions. The methods for calculating ice loads are basically alternative methods for predicting the behavior of ice under different loading conditions; as such, none of the models have been successful in predicting the behavior of ice under all loading conditions. Currently the only reliable method for accurately predicting ice forces on marine structures is to use large-scale empirical data for ice of the same state as that predicted for design. Extrapolation from ice behavioral data at a smaller scale or ice of a different state is generally required. In comparison to current uncertainties, reasonably accurate estimates of upper bound static ice forces can be made, and a design approach using this upper bound force is appropriate for very massive rigid structures and in designing for overall global stability. The periodicity of ice forces also needs to be considered in terms of dynamic amplification of structure deformation, potential liquefaction of soils, and fatigue life. In certain cases, the deflection of the structure can change the ice failure process and therefore change the level and nature of the ice force. 221 refs., 171 figs., 19 tabs.}
place = {Canada}
year = {1988}
month = {Jan}
}