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Liquid fuels from Canadian coals

Abstract

In Canadian energy planning, the central issue of security of supply must be addressed by developing flexible energy systems that make the best possible use of available resources. For liquid fuel production, oil sands and heavy oil currently appear more attractive than coal or biomass as alternatives to conventional crude oil, but the magnitude of their economic advantage is uncertain. The existence of large resources of oil sands, heavy oils, natural gas and low-sulfur coals in Western Canada creates a unique opportunity for Canadians to optimize the yield from these resources and develop new technology. Many variations on the three basic liquefaction routes - hydroliquefaction, pyrolysis and synthesis - are under investigation around the world, and the technology is advancing rapidly. Each process has merit under certain circumstances. Surface-mineable subbituminous and lignite coals of Alberta and Saskatchewan appear to offer the best combination of favorable properties, deposit size and mining cost, but other deposits in Alberta, Nova Scotia and British Columbia should not be ruled out. The research effort in Canada is small by world standards, but it is unlikely that technology could be imported that is ideally suited to Canadian conditions. Importing technology is undesirable: innovation or process modification  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Jun 15, 1979
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
CANMET-79-13
Reference Number:
ERA-05-011116; EPA-06-001747; EDB-80-032255
Subject:
01 COAL, LIGNITE, AND PEAT; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; CANADA; COAL DEPOSITS; COAL RESERVES; ENERGY DEMAND; ENERGY POLICY; ENERGY SUPPLIES; COAL LIQUEFACTION; RESEARCH PROGRAMS; BIOMASS; CATALYTIC EFFECTS; COAL; COMPARATIVE EVALUATIONS; ECONOMICS; FORECASTING; IMPORTS; LIQUID FUELS; MINERALS; OIL SANDS; PETROLEUM; PETROLEUM DEPOSITS; PETROLOGY; RESERVES; VISCOSITY; BITUMINOUS MATERIALS; CARBONACEOUS MATERIALS; DEMAND; ENERGY SOURCES; FOSSIL FUELS; FUELS; GEOLOGIC DEPOSITS; GEOLOGY; GOVERNMENT POLICIES; LIQUEFACTION; NORTH AMERICA; RENEWABLE ENERGY SOURCES; RESOURCES; THERMOCHEMICAL PROCESSES; 010405* - Coal, Lignite, & Peat- Hydrogenation & Liquefaction; 294001 - Energy Planning & Policy- Coal
Sponsoring Organizations:
Energy, Mines and Resources Canada
OSTI ID:
5630567
Research Organizations:
Canada Centre for Mineral and Energy Technology, Ottawa (Canada)
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Submitting Site:
TIC
Size:
Pages: 52
Announcement Date:

Citation Formats

Taylor, G. W. Liquid fuels from Canadian coals. Canada: N. p., 1979. Web.
Taylor, G. W. Liquid fuels from Canadian coals. Canada.
Taylor, G. W. 1979. "Liquid fuels from Canadian coals." Canada.
@misc{etde_5630567,
title = {Liquid fuels from Canadian coals}
author = {Taylor, G. W.}
abstractNote = {In Canadian energy planning, the central issue of security of supply must be addressed by developing flexible energy systems that make the best possible use of available resources. For liquid fuel production, oil sands and heavy oil currently appear more attractive than coal or biomass as alternatives to conventional crude oil, but the magnitude of their economic advantage is uncertain. The existence of large resources of oil sands, heavy oils, natural gas and low-sulfur coals in Western Canada creates a unique opportunity for Canadians to optimize the yield from these resources and develop new technology. Many variations on the three basic liquefaction routes - hydroliquefaction, pyrolysis and synthesis - are under investigation around the world, and the technology is advancing rapidly. Each process has merit under certain circumstances. Surface-mineable subbituminous and lignite coals of Alberta and Saskatchewan appear to offer the best combination of favorable properties, deposit size and mining cost, but other deposits in Alberta, Nova Scotia and British Columbia should not be ruled out. The research effort in Canada is small by world standards, but it is unlikely that technology could be imported that is ideally suited to Canadian conditions. Importing technology is undesirable: innovation or process modification to suit Canadian coals and markets is preferred; coprocessing of coal liquids with bitumen or heavy oils would be a uniquely Canadian, exportable technology. The cost of synthetic crude from coal in Canada is uncertain, estimates ranging from $113 to $220/m/sup 3/ ($18 to $35/bbl). Existing economic evaluations vary widely depending on assumptions, and can be misleading. Product quality is an important consideration.}
place = {Canada}
year = {1979}
month = {Jun}
}