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Studies on the dissolution and long term weathering of spilled crude oils

Technical Report:

Abstract

The development of a laboratory system for the study of the long term behavior of crude oil on a water surface is described. The apparatus consists of a cylindrical glass vessel containing water which is rotated at 33 rpm, thus creating a concave surface in which oil tends to accumulate at the center. Turbulence is induced by a stationary stirrer. Results are described of tests conducted with a number of crude oils and it is concluded that the system is able to create reproducible conditions of controlled evaporation, dissolution, turbulence, photolysis, and oil in water emulsion formation. A major advantage of the system is its simplicity and robustness which permits prolonged exposure of the oil to simulate weathering, over periods of weeks and months. A second system is described which can be used to determine the concentrations of dissolved hydrocarbons under oil slicks by in-situ headspace analysis. A prototype submersible sparger sampling system was devised and tested, and results are presented. It is concluded that the system is a promising and practical method of determining the extent to which dissolved hydrocarbons are present in water at various depths under an oil slick. In both cases it is concluded that the  More>>
Publication Date:
Apr 01, 1993
Product Type:
Technical Report
Report Number:
EE-145; MICROLOG-93-07196
Reference Number:
CANM-93-0E7760; EDB-94-017166
Subject:
02 PETROLEUM; OIL SPILLS; DISSOLUTION; WEATHERING; BENCH-SCALE EXPERIMENTS; LABORATORY EQUIPMENT; SAMPLERS; EQUIPMENT; 020900* - Petroleum- Environmental Aspects
OSTI ID:
5626188
Research Organizations:
Toronto Univ., ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Availability:
PC Environment Canada Departmental Library, Att: Pierre Trudel, Acquisitions, 351 St. Joseph Blvd., 2nd Fl., Ottawa, ON, CAN K1A 0H3; MF CANMET/TID, Energy, Mines and Resources Canada, 555 Booth St., Ottawa, Ont., Canada K1A 0G1 PC
Submitting Site:
CANM
Size:
Pages: (45 p)
Announcement Date:
May 13, 2001

Technical Report:

Citation Formats

Mackay, D, Charles, M E, Sumchi, Lee, Lun, R, Ooijen, H van, Romocki, K, Harner, T, and Ralfs, M. Studies on the dissolution and long term weathering of spilled crude oils. Canada: N. p., 1993. Web.
Mackay, D, Charles, M E, Sumchi, Lee, Lun, R, Ooijen, H van, Romocki, K, Harner, T, & Ralfs, M. Studies on the dissolution and long term weathering of spilled crude oils. Canada.
Mackay, D, Charles, M E, Sumchi, Lee, Lun, R, Ooijen, H van, Romocki, K, Harner, T, and Ralfs, M. 1993. "Studies on the dissolution and long term weathering of spilled crude oils." Canada.
@misc{etde_5626188,
title = {Studies on the dissolution and long term weathering of spilled crude oils}
author = {Mackay, D, Charles, M E, Sumchi, Lee, Lun, R, Ooijen, H van, Romocki, K, Harner, T, and Ralfs, M}
abstractNote = {The development of a laboratory system for the study of the long term behavior of crude oil on a water surface is described. The apparatus consists of a cylindrical glass vessel containing water which is rotated at 33 rpm, thus creating a concave surface in which oil tends to accumulate at the center. Turbulence is induced by a stationary stirrer. Results are described of tests conducted with a number of crude oils and it is concluded that the system is able to create reproducible conditions of controlled evaporation, dissolution, turbulence, photolysis, and oil in water emulsion formation. A major advantage of the system is its simplicity and robustness which permits prolonged exposure of the oil to simulate weathering, over periods of weeks and months. A second system is described which can be used to determine the concentrations of dissolved hydrocarbons under oil slicks by in-situ headspace analysis. A prototype submersible sparger sampling system was devised and tested, and results are presented. It is concluded that the system is a promising and practical method of determining the extent to which dissolved hydrocarbons are present in water at various depths under an oil slick. In both cases it is concluded that the concepts have sufficient merit that further work is justified. Recommendations are made for further research and development which will, it is hoped, enable these systems to be used to investigate aspects of the fate and effects of oil spills at sea. 6 refs., 14 figs., 4 tabs.}
place = {Canada}
year = {1993}
month = {Apr}
}