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Lagrangian measurements of sulfur dioxide to sulfate conversion rates

Abstract

On the basis of Project MISTT data and proposed homogenous gas phase oxidation mechanisms for sulfur dioxide, it has been suggested that the degree of mixing with background air, the chemical composition of the background air, and the intensity of the sunlight available are key factors determining the rate of sulfur dioxide to sulfate conversion. These hypotheses are examined in light of Lagrangian measrements of conversion rates in power plant plumes made during the Tennessee Plume Study and Project Da Vinci. It is found that the Lagrangian conversion rate measurements are consistent with these hypotheses. It has also been suggested that the concentration of ozone may serve as a workable surrogate for the concentrations of the free radicals involved in the homogeneous gas phase mechanism. The night-time Lagrangian data remind one that the gross difference in mean lifetime of ozone and free radicals can lead to situations in which the ozone concentration is not a good surrogate for the free radical concentrations.
Authors:
Publication Date:
Dec 01, 1981
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
ERA-07-030536; EDB-82-072994
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Atmos. Environ.; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 15:12
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 20 FOSSIL-FUELED POWER PLANTS; SULFUR DIOXIDE; OXIDATION; AIR POLLUTION; ATMOSPHERIC CHEMISTRY; CHEMICAL COMPOSITION; CONVERSION; FOSSIL-FUEL POWER PLANTS; LAGRANGE EQUATIONS; LAGRANGIAN FUNCTION; MEASURING METHODS; MIXING; OZONE; PLUMES; RADICALS; SULFATES; SURFACE AIR; AIR; CHALCOGENIDES; CHEMICAL REACTIONS; CHEMISTRY; DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS; EQUATIONS; FLUIDS; FUNCTIONS; GASES; OXIDES; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; PARTIAL DIFFERENTIAL EQUATIONS; POLLUTION; POWER PLANTS; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; SULFUR OXIDES; THERMAL POWER PLANTS; 500200* - Environment, Atmospheric- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (-1989); 200202 - Fossil-Fueled Power Plants- Waste Management- Noxious Gas & Particulate Emissions
OSTI ID:
5616655
Research Organizations:
Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: ATENB
Submitting Site:
SAI
Size:
Pages: 2583-2591
Announcement Date:
Apr 01, 1982

Citation Formats

Zak, B D. Lagrangian measurements of sulfur dioxide to sulfate conversion rates. United Kingdom: N. p., 1981. Web. doi:10.1016/0004-6981(81)90075-5.
Zak, B D. Lagrangian measurements of sulfur dioxide to sulfate conversion rates. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/0004-6981(81)90075-5.
Zak, B D. 1981. "Lagrangian measurements of sulfur dioxide to sulfate conversion rates." United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/0004-6981(81)90075-5. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1016/0004-6981(81)90075-5.
@misc{etde_5616655,
title = {Lagrangian measurements of sulfur dioxide to sulfate conversion rates}
author = {Zak, B D}
abstractNote = {On the basis of Project MISTT data and proposed homogenous gas phase oxidation mechanisms for sulfur dioxide, it has been suggested that the degree of mixing with background air, the chemical composition of the background air, and the intensity of the sunlight available are key factors determining the rate of sulfur dioxide to sulfate conversion. These hypotheses are examined in light of Lagrangian measrements of conversion rates in power plant plumes made during the Tennessee Plume Study and Project Da Vinci. It is found that the Lagrangian conversion rate measurements are consistent with these hypotheses. It has also been suggested that the concentration of ozone may serve as a workable surrogate for the concentrations of the free radicals involved in the homogeneous gas phase mechanism. The night-time Lagrangian data remind one that the gross difference in mean lifetime of ozone and free radicals can lead to situations in which the ozone concentration is not a good surrogate for the free radical concentrations.}
doi = {10.1016/0004-6981(81)90075-5}
journal = {Atmos. Environ.; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {15:12}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1981}
month = {Dec}
}