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Human disturbances on coral reefs in Sri Lanka: A case study

Conference:

Abstract

The degradation of coral reefs in Sri Lanka has increased substantially over the last decades. Human activities causing this degradation include: mining for lime production, sewage discharges, discharges of oil and other pollutants in connection with shipping and port activities, destructive fishing practices, land and mangrove destruction, tourism and the collecting of fauna such as fish, shells and corals. In this study, three adjacent coral reefs; Bar Reef, Talawila Reef, and Kandakuliya Reef, which are widely scattered patch reefs off Kalpitiya Peninsula, northwestern Sri Lanka, were surveyed and compared in terms of their fish and coral diversity and abundance as well as human and natural disturbances. Information was gathered by snorkeling in visual overview surveys and by scuba diving in detailed transect surveys. When each reef was ranked according to the extent of live coral cover, and chaetodontid diversity, the results indicated that Bar Reef was in excellent condition, Talawila Reef was intermediate, and Kandakuliya Reef was in poor condition. The diversity of coral genera, the topographic relief and the proportion of coral rubble, did not follow the same pattern. The number of coral genera found was 49, while 283 fish species belonging to 51 families were recorded. Human disturbance  More>>
Authors:
Oehman, M C; Linden, O; [1]  Rajasuriya, A [2] 
  1. Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Zoology
  2. NARA, Crow Island, Colombo (Sri Lanka)
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1993
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
CONF-9309307-
Reference Number:
SWD-93-007404; EDB-94-021389
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Ambio (Journal of the Human Environment, Research and Management); (Sweden); Journal Volume: 22:7; Conference: Royal Colloquium on Tropical and Subtropical Coastal Zone Management. A question of carbon flow in a sectoral society, Stockholm (Sweden), 5-6 Sep 1993
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; 29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; CORALS; RESOURCE MANAGEMENT; HUMAN FACTORS; ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS; AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS; CARBON SINKS; COASTAL WATERS; ESTUARIES; REEFS; SRI LANKA; TROPICAL REGIONS; WATER POLLUTION; ANIMALS; ASIA; CNIDARIA; COELENTERATA; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; ECOSYSTEMS; GEOLOGIC STRUCTURES; INVERTEBRATES; ISLANDS; MANAGEMENT; POLLUTION; SINKS; SURFACE WATERS; 540310* - Environment, Aquatic- Basic Studies- (1990-); 290301 - Energy Planning & Policy- Environment, Health, & Safety- Regional & Global Environmental Aspects- (1992-)
OSTI ID:
5581668
Country of Origin:
Sweden
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: ISSN 0044-7447; CODEN: AMBOCX
Submitting Site:
SWD
Size:
Pages: 474-480
Announcement Date:

Conference:

Citation Formats

Oehman, M C, Linden, O, and Rajasuriya, A. Human disturbances on coral reefs in Sri Lanka: A case study. Sweden: N. p., 1993. Web.
Oehman, M C, Linden, O, & Rajasuriya, A. Human disturbances on coral reefs in Sri Lanka: A case study. Sweden.
Oehman, M C, Linden, O, and Rajasuriya, A. 1993. "Human disturbances on coral reefs in Sri Lanka: A case study." Sweden.
@misc{etde_5581668,
title = {Human disturbances on coral reefs in Sri Lanka: A case study}
author = {Oehman, M C, Linden, O, and Rajasuriya, A}
abstractNote = {The degradation of coral reefs in Sri Lanka has increased substantially over the last decades. Human activities causing this degradation include: mining for lime production, sewage discharges, discharges of oil and other pollutants in connection with shipping and port activities, destructive fishing practices, land and mangrove destruction, tourism and the collecting of fauna such as fish, shells and corals. In this study, three adjacent coral reefs; Bar Reef, Talawila Reef, and Kandakuliya Reef, which are widely scattered patch reefs off Kalpitiya Peninsula, northwestern Sri Lanka, were surveyed and compared in terms of their fish and coral diversity and abundance as well as human and natural disturbances. Information was gathered by snorkeling in visual overview surveys and by scuba diving in detailed transect surveys. When each reef was ranked according to the extent of live coral cover, and chaetodontid diversity, the results indicated that Bar Reef was in excellent condition, Talawila Reef was intermediate, and Kandakuliya Reef was in poor condition. The diversity of coral genera, the topographic relief and the proportion of coral rubble, did not follow the same pattern. The number of coral genera found was 49, while 283 fish species belonging to 51 families were recorded. Human disturbance factors on the reefs were found to be net fishing, boat anchoring and ornamental fish collection for the aquarium trade. Bottom.set nylon nets in particular were found to have a very destructive impact on the bottom fauna. 33 refs, 7 figs, 1 tab}
journal = {Ambio (Journal of the Human Environment, Research and Management); (Sweden)}
volume = {22:7}
place = {Sweden}
year = {1993}
month = {Jan}
}