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Informing the public about the risks from ionizing radiation

Journal Article:

Abstract

Designers of programs for informing the public about radiation hazards need to consider the difficulties inherent in communicating highly technical information about risk. To be effective, information campaigns must be buttressed by empirical research aimed at determining what people know, what they want to know, and how best to convey that information. Drawing upon studies of risk perception, some of the problems that any information program must confront are described.
Authors:
Slovic, P; Fischhoff, B; Lichtenstein, S [1] 
  1. Perceptronics, Eugene, OR (USA)
Publication Date:
Oct 01, 1981
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
AIX-13-661716; EDB-82-080040
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Health Phys.; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 41:4
Subject:
99 GENERAL AND MISCELLANEOUS//MATHEMATICS, COMPUTING, AND INFORMATION SCIENCE; RADIATION HAZARDS; PUBLIC RELATIONS; IONIZING RADIATIONS; HAZARDS; HEALTH HAZARDS; RADIATIONS; 570000* - Health & Safety
OSTI ID:
5575357
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: HLTPA
Submitting Site:
INIS
Size:
Pages: 589-598
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Slovic, P, Fischhoff, B, and Lichtenstein, S. Informing the public about the risks from ionizing radiation. United Kingdom: N. p., 1981. Web.
Slovic, P, Fischhoff, B, & Lichtenstein, S. Informing the public about the risks from ionizing radiation. United Kingdom.
Slovic, P, Fischhoff, B, and Lichtenstein, S. 1981. "Informing the public about the risks from ionizing radiation." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_5575357,
title = {Informing the public about the risks from ionizing radiation}
author = {Slovic, P, Fischhoff, B, and Lichtenstein, S}
abstractNote = {Designers of programs for informing the public about radiation hazards need to consider the difficulties inherent in communicating highly technical information about risk. To be effective, information campaigns must be buttressed by empirical research aimed at determining what people know, what they want to know, and how best to convey that information. Drawing upon studies of risk perception, some of the problems that any information program must confront are described.}
journal = {Health Phys.; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {41:4}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1981}
month = {Oct}
}