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Tropical deforestation: balancing regional development demands and global environmental concerns

Abstract

Over half of the world's tropical closed forests, which contain the greatest biodiversity, are found in just three countries: Brazil, Indonesia, and Zaire. Accelerated conversion of tropical forests is occurring because of several interlocking socio-economic and political factors: inequitable land distribution, entrenched rural poverty, and rapidly growing populations which push landless and near-landless peasants on to forest lands that are often infertile. If rates instead of absolute numbers are used to measure the severity of deforestation, Nigeria, Argentina, India, Thailand, Myanmar (Burma), Ecquador, and above all Ivory Coast stand out as countries facing an immediate deforestation crisis. Local management of forest resources, however, can be very contentious and complicated, with overlapping government agencies, competing economic interests, and ambiguous regulations. Without capital investment and entrepreneurial initiatives, residents of forest regions may have no alternative but to farm increasingly infertile soils. Non-governmental organizations, such as the World Wildlife Fund are playing leading roles in innovative debt-for-nature swaps and other forest conservation efforts. International development agencies, such as the World Bank, may play the leading role in conservation and reforestation efforts through their financial assistance programmes. The media, as a global information network, has become a powerful influence on the debate over deforestation.  More>>
Authors:
Wood, A B [1] 
  1. US Dept. of State, Washington, DC (USA)
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1990
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
CLA-92-041536; EDB-92-057645
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Global Environmental Change; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 1:1
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; DEFORESTATION; GREENHOUSE EFFECT; TROPICAL REGIONS; CLIMATIC CHANGE; DEVELOPING COUNTRIES; ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT; 290301* - Energy Planning & Policy- Environment, Health, & Safety- Regional & Global Environmental Aspects- (1992-); 290201 - Energy Planning & Policy- Economics- (1992-)
OSTI ID:
5558097
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: XZ092
Submitting Site:
CLA
Size:
Pages: 23-41
Announcement Date:
May 01, 1992

Citation Formats

Wood, A B. Tropical deforestation: balancing regional development demands and global environmental concerns. United Kingdom: N. p., 1990. Web. doi:10.1016/0959-3780(90)90005-T.
Wood, A B. Tropical deforestation: balancing regional development demands and global environmental concerns. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/0959-3780(90)90005-T.
Wood, A B. 1990. "Tropical deforestation: balancing regional development demands and global environmental concerns." United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/0959-3780(90)90005-T. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1016/0959-3780(90)90005-T.
@misc{etde_5558097,
title = {Tropical deforestation: balancing regional development demands and global environmental concerns}
author = {Wood, A B}
abstractNote = {Over half of the world's tropical closed forests, which contain the greatest biodiversity, are found in just three countries: Brazil, Indonesia, and Zaire. Accelerated conversion of tropical forests is occurring because of several interlocking socio-economic and political factors: inequitable land distribution, entrenched rural poverty, and rapidly growing populations which push landless and near-landless peasants on to forest lands that are often infertile. If rates instead of absolute numbers are used to measure the severity of deforestation, Nigeria, Argentina, India, Thailand, Myanmar (Burma), Ecquador, and above all Ivory Coast stand out as countries facing an immediate deforestation crisis. Local management of forest resources, however, can be very contentious and complicated, with overlapping government agencies, competing economic interests, and ambiguous regulations. Without capital investment and entrepreneurial initiatives, residents of forest regions may have no alternative but to farm increasingly infertile soils. Non-governmental organizations, such as the World Wildlife Fund are playing leading roles in innovative debt-for-nature swaps and other forest conservation efforts. International development agencies, such as the World Bank, may play the leading role in conservation and reforestation efforts through their financial assistance programmes. The media, as a global information network, has become a powerful influence on the debate over deforestation. The Third World, bearing an increasingly heavy burden of payments to lending institutions that in 1988 surpassed 50 billion US dollars, will make a strong case that it cannot afford widespread forest conservation.}
doi = {10.1016/0959-3780(90)90005-T}
journal = {Global Environmental Change; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {1:1}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1990}
month = {Jan}
}