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Recent progresses in materials for the direct methanol fuel cell

Conference:

Abstract

Research programs are being conducted worldwide to develop a clean, zero emissions electric vehicle. However, even with the most advanced batteries, such as nickel/metal hydride, or lithium ion batteries, the driving range is limited and the recharging time is long. Only fuel cells which can convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy can compete with internal combustion engines. This paper reviewed the recent progress made in the development of a direct methanol fuel cell using the concept developed for the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). It was noted that the electrode materials, at the methanol anode and oxygen cathode need to be improved by using multifunctional electrocatalysts. The development of new temperature resistant proton exchange membranes with good ionic conductivity and low methanol cross-over, which resulted from the need to increase operating temperatures above 100 degrees C was also reviewed. 35 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.
Authors:
Lamy, C; Leger, J M [1] 
  1. Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 86 - Poitiers (France)
Publication Date:
Dec 31, 1997
Product Type:
Conference
Report Number:
CONF-970738-
Reference Number:
SCA: 300500; 330300; PA: CANM-97:003212; EDB-98:005492; SN: 98001893051
Resource Relation:
Conference: 2. international symposium on new materials for fuel cell and modern battery systems, Montreal (Canada), 6-10 Jul 1997; Other Information: PBD: 1997; Related Information: Is Part Of New materials for fuel cell and modern battery systems: Proceedings of a symposium; Savadogo, O.; Roberge, P.R. [eds.]; PB: 914 p.
Subject:
30 DIRECT ENERGY CONVERSION; 33 ADVANCED PROPULSION SYSTEMS; ALCOHOL FUEL CELLS; METHANOL; ELECTRIC-POWERED VEHICLES; DIRECT ENERGY CONVERTERS; ELECTRIC BATTERIES; ELECTRODES
Sponsoring Organizations:
Commission of the European Communities (Luxembourg). Directorate General for Science, Research and Development, DG XII; Agence de l`Environnement et de la Maitrise de l`Energie, 75 - Paris (France); Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CNRS), 75 - Paris (France); Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, PQ (Canada). Dept. of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering; Quebec Ministere de l`Energie et des Ressources, PQ (Canada)
OSTI ID:
555506
Research Organizations:
Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal, PQ (Canada)
Country of Origin:
Canada
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Other: ISBN 2-533-00624-1; TRN: CA9703212
Availability:
Available from Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal, C.P. 6079, Succursale Centre-ville, Montreal, Quebec, H3C 3A7
Submitting Site:
CANM
Size:
pp. 477-488
Announcement Date:

Conference:

Citation Formats

Lamy, C, and Leger, J M. Recent progresses in materials for the direct methanol fuel cell. Canada: N. p., 1997. Web.
Lamy, C, & Leger, J M. Recent progresses in materials for the direct methanol fuel cell. Canada.
Lamy, C, and Leger, J M. 1997. "Recent progresses in materials for the direct methanol fuel cell." Canada.
@misc{etde_555506,
title = {Recent progresses in materials for the direct methanol fuel cell}
author = {Lamy, C, and Leger, J M}
abstractNote = {Research programs are being conducted worldwide to develop a clean, zero emissions electric vehicle. However, even with the most advanced batteries, such as nickel/metal hydride, or lithium ion batteries, the driving range is limited and the recharging time is long. Only fuel cells which can convert chemical energy directly into electrical energy can compete with internal combustion engines. This paper reviewed the recent progress made in the development of a direct methanol fuel cell using the concept developed for the proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). It was noted that the electrode materials, at the methanol anode and oxygen cathode need to be improved by using multifunctional electrocatalysts. The development of new temperature resistant proton exchange membranes with good ionic conductivity and low methanol cross-over, which resulted from the need to increase operating temperatures above 100 degrees C was also reviewed. 35 refs., 1 tab., 2 figs.}
place = {Canada}
year = {1997}
month = {Dec}
}