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Distribution and isotopic abundance of sulphur in recent marine sediments off southern California

Abstract

Analyses of sulphur compounds in basin sediments off southern California indicate that elemental sulphur, free sulphide, hydrotroilite, organic sulphur, sulphate and pyrite are present in quantities that vary with environment and depth in the sediments. Pyrite is generally the most abundant form, occurring in oxidizing as well as in reducing sediments and often constituting 90% of total sulphur. A material balance indicates that the total sulphur content is far in excess of the sulphate-sulphur initially trapped in the interstitial water. This evidence, together with failure to detect significant alternate sources, suggests that sulphate-sulphur is extracted from the overlying sea water at the sediment-water interface. Isotope measurements confirm many of the conclusions suggested by the quantitative chemical analyses. The show that biological sulphate reduction is the single most important process in the sulphur cycle. The sulphide released is converted to hydrotrolite and then to pyrite. Elemental and organic sulphur appear to be continually forming and reacting in the sediment column. The organic sulphur released from decaying organic matter apparently plays only a small role in the sulphur economy. Enrichment in S/sup 32/ ranging from 9 to 62% was measured in pyrite fragments, a spread similar to that previously observed in ancient  More>>
Publication Date:
Jan 01, 1963
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EDB-83-188244
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 27
Subject:
54 ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES; SEDIMENTS; CHEMICAL ANALYSIS; SULFUR COMPOUNDS; ABUNDANCE; ACIDIFICATION; CALIFORNIA; COASTAL WATERS; DISTRIBUTION; ISOTOPE RATIO; MATERIAL BALANCE; MINERAL CYCLING; ORGANIC SULFUR COMPOUNDS; PYRITE; SULFATES; SULFIDES; SULFUR; SULFUR 32; CHALCOGENIDES; ELEMENTS; EVEN-EVEN NUCLEI; FEDERAL REGION IX; IRON COMPOUNDS; IRON SULFIDES; ISOTOPES; LIGHT NUCLEI; MINERALS; NONMETALS; NORTH AMERICA; NUCLEI; ORGANIC COMPOUNDS; OXYGEN COMPOUNDS; STABLE ISOTOPES; SULFIDE MINERALS; SULFUR ISOTOPES; SURFACE WATERS; TRANSITION ELEMENT COMPOUNDS; USA; 520200* - Environment, Aquatic- Chemicals Monitoring & Transport- (-1989)
OSTI ID:
5554713
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: GCACA
Submitting Site:
HEDB
Size:
Pages: 297-331
Announcement Date:
Aug 01, 1983

Citation Formats

Kaplan, I R, Emergy, K O, and Rittenberg, S C. Distribution and isotopic abundance of sulphur in recent marine sediments off southern California. United Kingdom: N. p., 1963. Web. doi:10.1016/0016-7037(63)90074-7.
Kaplan, I R, Emergy, K O, & Rittenberg, S C. Distribution and isotopic abundance of sulphur in recent marine sediments off southern California. United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/0016-7037(63)90074-7.
Kaplan, I R, Emergy, K O, and Rittenberg, S C. 1963. "Distribution and isotopic abundance of sulphur in recent marine sediments off southern California." United Kingdom. doi:10.1016/0016-7037(63)90074-7. https://www.osti.gov/servlets/purl/10.1016/0016-7037(63)90074-7.
@misc{etde_5554713,
title = {Distribution and isotopic abundance of sulphur in recent marine sediments off southern California}
author = {Kaplan, I R, Emergy, K O, and Rittenberg, S C}
abstractNote = {Analyses of sulphur compounds in basin sediments off southern California indicate that elemental sulphur, free sulphide, hydrotroilite, organic sulphur, sulphate and pyrite are present in quantities that vary with environment and depth in the sediments. Pyrite is generally the most abundant form, occurring in oxidizing as well as in reducing sediments and often constituting 90% of total sulphur. A material balance indicates that the total sulphur content is far in excess of the sulphate-sulphur initially trapped in the interstitial water. This evidence, together with failure to detect significant alternate sources, suggests that sulphate-sulphur is extracted from the overlying sea water at the sediment-water interface. Isotope measurements confirm many of the conclusions suggested by the quantitative chemical analyses. The show that biological sulphate reduction is the single most important process in the sulphur cycle. The sulphide released is converted to hydrotrolite and then to pyrite. Elemental and organic sulphur appear to be continually forming and reacting in the sediment column. The organic sulphur released from decaying organic matter apparently plays only a small role in the sulphur economy. Enrichment in S/sup 32/ ranging from 9 to 62% was measured in pyrite fragments, a spread similar to that previously observed in ancient sediments. Data from field and laboratory experiments were combined to determine rate of sulphate reduction, number of sulphate reducing bacteria and the amount of organic matter decomposed during sulphate reduction in the sediment, as well as rate of renewal of water in the basins. The results suggest that the methods used may have many applications for elucidating in situ rate processes.}
doi = {10.1016/0016-7037(63)90074-7}
journal = {Geochim. Cosmochim. Acta; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {27}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1963}
month = {Jan}
}