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Cost and code study of underground building: a report to the Minnesota Energy Agency

Journal Article:

Abstract

The rapidly intensifying interest in the possible energy savings and environmental and land-use benefits associated with underground buildings has led increasing numbers of people to question restrictions that existing building codes place on underground construction and to make cost comparisons between underground structures and more-conventional buildings. Information in this report on earth-sheltered houses covers public policy issues (building code restrictions, taxation, insurance) and residential construction costs (cost breakdowns, general factors affecting costs, and life-cycle costs). The report also deals with regulatory and insurance issues (building codes, fire protection, insurance provisions) and construction costs for large underground buildings. The report recommends that: (1) the Minnesota Energy Agency consult with the Building Code Division of the Department of Administration on HUD Minimum Property Standards to examine the possibility of modifying several building-code requirements that affect earth-sheltered housing design; (2) HUD Minimum Property Standards be brought into line with the major building codes on the question of optional mechanical ventilation in houses; (3) model ordinances concerning setbacks, basement house provisions, and minimum square footage provisions to be drafted; (4) legal questions concerning the separation of ownership of the surface from that subsurface space be resolved; (5) questions concerning taxation of mined space be  More>>
Authors:
Publication Date:
Nov 01, 1979
Product Type:
Journal Article
Reference Number:
EPA-06-001645; EDB-80-034829
Resource Relation:
Journal Name: Underground Space; (United Kingdom); Journal Volume: 4:3
Subject:
29 ENERGY PLANNING, POLICY AND ECONOMY; 32 ENERGY CONSERVATION, CONSUMPTION, AND UTILIZATION; EARTH-COVERED BUILDINGS; BUILDING CODES; COST; BUILDING MATERIALS; DESIGN; PROPERTY RIGHTS; PUBLIC POLICY; REGULATIONS; UNDERGROUND SPACE; BUILDINGS; MATERIALS; 291000* - Energy Planning & Policy- Conservation; 320100 - Energy Conservation, Consumption, & Utilization- Buildings
OSTI ID:
5532079
Research Organizations:
Univ. of Minnesota, Minneapolis
Country of Origin:
United Kingdom
Language:
English
Other Identifying Numbers:
Journal ID: CODEN: UNSPD
Submitting Site:
TIC
Size:
Pages: 119-136
Announcement Date:

Journal Article:

Citation Formats

Sterling, R L. Cost and code study of underground building: a report to the Minnesota Energy Agency. United Kingdom: N. p., 1979. Web.
Sterling, R L. Cost and code study of underground building: a report to the Minnesota Energy Agency. United Kingdom.
Sterling, R L. 1979. "Cost and code study of underground building: a report to the Minnesota Energy Agency." United Kingdom.
@misc{etde_5532079,
title = {Cost and code study of underground building: a report to the Minnesota Energy Agency}
author = {Sterling, R L}
abstractNote = {The rapidly intensifying interest in the possible energy savings and environmental and land-use benefits associated with underground buildings has led increasing numbers of people to question restrictions that existing building codes place on underground construction and to make cost comparisons between underground structures and more-conventional buildings. Information in this report on earth-sheltered houses covers public policy issues (building code restrictions, taxation, insurance) and residential construction costs (cost breakdowns, general factors affecting costs, and life-cycle costs). The report also deals with regulatory and insurance issues (building codes, fire protection, insurance provisions) and construction costs for large underground buildings. The report recommends that: (1) the Minnesota Energy Agency consult with the Building Code Division of the Department of Administration on HUD Minimum Property Standards to examine the possibility of modifying several building-code requirements that affect earth-sheltered housing design; (2) HUD Minimum Property Standards be brought into line with the major building codes on the question of optional mechanical ventilation in houses; (3) model ordinances concerning setbacks, basement house provisions, and minimum square footage provisions to be drafted; (4) legal questions concerning the separation of ownership of the surface from that subsurface space be resolved; (5) questions concerning taxation of mined space be resolved; and (6) a life-cost inventory of underground residences and buildings in Minnesota be compiled.}
journal = {Underground Space; (United Kingdom)}
volume = {4:3}
journal type = {AC}
place = {United Kingdom}
year = {1979}
month = {Nov}
}